Posts tagged: crops

15 Essential Crops To Have In Your Survival Garden

15 Essential Crops To Have In Your Survival Garden

In a survival scenario the key word is self-reliance. The weekly trips to the local food markets or stores will cease to become an option. And even if available, the prices will most likely sky-rocket so that it just won’t be convenient anymore. What you need to do is consider the possibility to set up your very own garden, which will sustain and provide for you and your entire family. It’s a rather complex task, but it’s nowhere near impossible. And once you’ll get the hang of it, it will become rather relaxing and enjoyable.

It’s something that can ultimately be achieved by the average Joe, with enough practice, resources and dedication. You don’t have to be a professional farmer, you’ll just have to educate yourself a little in the matter. Be aware of the sustenance and nutrients each product has to offer, calculate how much land you’ll need for the endeavor and set your budget. Your best weapon (if you decide to pick up the shovel) is information: educate yourself on season crops, micro-farming, insect repellants, seed collections and storage and on the nutritional value of various crops.

And arm yourself with patience, because this type of activity requires a lot of practice if you’re starting from scratch. But you’ll get better at it with time, and at some point you’ll be become self sufficient, even though if you originally started gardening as a hobby. When it comes to choosing the right seeds, I strongly recommend getting non-GMO or heirloom variety seeds. These seeds will continue to reproduce, unlike the hybrid varieties that stop reproducing after the first season. Let’s have a look at different types of seeds that are suited for your very own survival garden.

Corn – it’s a warm weather crop, very intolerant to low temperatures, so you should plant it only after the last frost. It usually produces two ears per stack and it’s loaded with calcium, iron and protein. It’s easy to pick and to store.

Wheat – possibly the most common crop in the world, because of its large content of nutrients like copper, iron zinc and potassium. Spring what is planted in early spring and it’s the most common variety in the world. Winter wheat can be planted anytime from late September to mid October.

Potatoes – they’re high in protein, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and potassium. It’s best if you plant your potatoes 4 – 6 weeks before the last frost. An average plant will hold somewhere in the lines of 4 -6 potatoes per sprout. When storing them, just know to keep them in a very cool and dark place, away from fruit.

Peas – it’s one of the most (if not THE) easiest plants to grow, because most varieties are not pretentious and grow very fast. Peas are rich in fiber, protein, potassium, vitamin A, Vitamin B6 and more. The best varieties to consider are the snap, the shelling and the sugar and snow pod. They will do just fine even during a harsh winter, as they’re resistant to frost.10 Foods You Can Store For 100 Years

Spinach – considered the original super-food, it’s a great source of nutrients such as vitamin A, vitamin C, folic acid, iron and thiamin. It’s easy to grow, and most species grow best during winter. There are a few though that stray from the rule, so inform yourself before purchase.

Tomatoes – once again, we’re dealing with one of the easiest plants to plant and grow. It’s very nutritious as it’s abundant in vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin E, potassium, thiamine and niacin. To make sure you get plenty of them throughout the year, just plant a first batch in late spring and a second one in late summer.

Beans – they come in many varieties, such as kidney beans, pole beans, bush beans etc. They are rich in fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium and Calcium. Pole beans require steak firmly planted in the ground, on which the plant can grapple and grow. Their grow cycle is shorter than that of the bush beans and the yield production is better as well. It’s easy to grow and staggering the plant will give continuous yields.

Carrots – there are very easy to grow and prefer cooler weather. So the best time for planting would be during fall, winter or early spring. They’re rich in vitamin A and beta carotene, which is excellent anti-oxidant which does wanders for your eyesight, skin or hair.

Garlic and Onions – they’re a very rich source vitamin B6, vitamin C, potassium, dietary fiber and folic acid (folate). They’re best planted in mid or late October, and can be pulled early in case you’re eager to have green onions or garlic.

Cucumbers – they come in all shapes and sizes, with many varieties to choose from. You can pick whatever you like, from large to small ones (which are excellent for pickling). They are very nutritious, as they are loaded with vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K and potassium. They are a crop for warm weather and if you pick them regularly, you’ll get increased production.

Lettuce – not only will it be easy to plant and grow, but is also one of the earliest harvests you’ll get. It’s best if you plant it somewhere at 6 – 8 before the first frost date for optimum results. It grows quickly and you can pick it partially simply by choosing a few leaves at a time. The nutritional content differs in case of variety, but mostly all contain proteins, vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin C, calcium, potassium, folic acid and iron.

Eggplants – it’s one of the most versatile vegetables when it comes to cooking, as it offers a lot of possibilities. It’s a warm weather plant and doesn’t do well during winter. So you should wait after the last frost is over in order to plant it. It’s high in fiber, vitamin B1, vitamin B6 and anti-oxidants.

Broccoli – it’s a plant that grows rather easily. It’s usually planted mid to late summer and by the time fall is upon us, you’ll have your first broccoli harvest. It has however, the tendency to give yields even after the first harvest. It can withstand mild frost, but won’t survive a harsher climate. A far as nutrients go, it’s most commonly packed with vitamin A, vitamin K and protein.

Cauliflower – it’s a cool season vegetable, resistant to low temperatures. It’s quite fast to grow and gives extremely rich yields. It’s very nutritious and can be very versatile when it comes to cooking. It’s packed with vitamin C, vitamin K and dietary fibers.

Turnips – the seeds are best sown in late may, but if you get caught in doing anything else and forget, early summer will do just fine. They’re easy to manage, as they’re very resilient to plant diseases. It’s very versatile too, as you can eat the whole plant, green and root alike. They contain calcium, vitamin B6, vitamin C and iron.

This list is a must for your very own garden, the plants that no survival enthusiast should go without during a crisis. Remember what I said before: take your time and practice, because it’s unlikely you’ll be successful right away. But once you get the hang of it, you and those close to you won’t go hungry a day in case SHTF. So get going, get your hands dirty and you’ll pick the fruit of you labor in no time… literally!

By My Family Survival Plan

Global Climate Change: What’s Happening And How Will It Affect Us?

Global Climate Change - What’s Happening And How Does It Affect Us

Climate change is taking place! Slowly but surely it’s affecting everything, including the American continent. Over the past 50 years, in the U.S. alone, the temperatures have risen by 2°F. By the end of the century they are about to grow by another 7 – 11°F more. The effects can be dampened only if the pollution factor gets dropped to a minimum, this meaning the temperatures rise will only be about 4–6.5°F.

The U.S. Global Research Program (a consortium consisting of 13 federal department and agencies) released a reports that talk about the seriousness of climate changes and how they impact everyday life in the U.S. The general consensus is that if we act swiftly, cautiously and take all the necessary precautions, the impact of climate changes will be minimum on social life, the economy and the environment.

Here is what’s going on at the moment. And these changes will only continue to further throughout the continent, according to the Third National Climate Assessment Report.

The Northeast’s heat waves, heavy precipitations and the fast and constant rise of the sea level will end up in having severe consequences on every-day life. More and more cities in the danger zone have begun lately to consider the climate change effects as a serious problem, as they can heavily debilitate ecosystems, agriculture and even infrastructure.

In the Southeast there’s also talk and worry about the ever-rising sea level and the direct negative impact it could have on the local environment and economy. Extreme heat waves will engulf the area, affecting everything from agriculture to industry to personal health of the populous. Water reserves and availability will decrease, resulting in severe consequences.

The Southwest’s main reason of concern is the wildfires brought on by massive increases on heat and severe droughts. Insect outburst have also been recorded in several states in the region. The continuous erosion of the coastal area is bound to bring heavy flooding on the continent. Public health will be generally affected by the heat waves and the decline of the water supplies will affect crops and the ecosystem alike.

The Northwest will be subject to coastal erosion, sea level rise and flooding. Ocean acidity levels seem to have risen in the past years. Insect outbreaks have already been recorded and plant diseases seem to affect more and more trees. Dead trees, devoid of water and nutriments pose a great risk as they’re easily subject to wildfires.

The Midwest will be severely affect by extreme downpours. As a result of this, infrastructure, agriculture, transportation and general health will be severely affected. The heavy rains will alternate with waves of extreme heat. This alternation will have dire consequences on the ecosystems of the Great Lakes.

crops

Impacts on public health

Extreme heat waves normally occur on the continent once every 20 years or so. But if the emission and atmospheric pollution levels are not reduced fast, we risk been subject to such heat waves every single year! The temperature won’t suffer only a change in occurrence, but also in intensity, as extreme temperatures can grow by a mind-blowing 10°F!

Those most susceptible and most vulnerable to such an impact are children, the elderly and the sick. Higher temperatures will create the conditions for rising levels of lung-damaging low-altitude ozone and respiratory allergies in urban areas.

The risk of ozone levels is imminent. Based on today’s levels of air pollution, scientist predict that by mid-century the number of Red Ozone Alert Days (when the air is unhealthy for everybody) will have increased by 68%. The most affected area will be the Eastern part of the country. In New Mexico the health costs from low-altitude ozone and heat weaves will total to a $1.6 billion by 2080.

extreme heat map

The heat waves will rise and effect even the areas with poor history of such phenomena, like the Northeast (where there have never been recorded over 2 days in a row of +100°F or more than 20 days in a row of +90°F). Under a high emissions scenario (where air pollution levels haven’t decreased in the slightest) many urban regions in the area will be subject to over 60 days of +90°F by 2100 and 14 – 28 days of +100°F (in major cities la Philadelphia or New York). The Midwest faces even graver dangers due to high temperature rises, especially cities like Cleveland and San Diego.

The Southeast and Gulf states are also targeted by the upcoming heat waves. Miami will become hotter the Bangkok (considered to be the world’s hottest major city at the present) and in cities like Florida, the daily highs could exceed 90°F for more than half a year. In cities like Dallas, Houston and Tampa extreme heat claims on average 28 deaths per year. It takes only a moderate increase in temperature to increase this number to 60 – 75 deaths per year.

In major cities (like California) heat-related costs could grow by 2100 to about $14billion per year.

As general advice, try and keep away as much from the sun as possible. Drink plenty of fluids, make sure you stack up on water and wear sun-screen if you must go out on a hot day. Don’t over expose yourself to air-conditioning during hot weather, as sudden changes in temperature and humidity affect the respiratory system.

By My Family Survival Plan

USA: Back To The Wild Wild West This Fall

Yesterday, I was surfing the Internet, reading the latest news, when I stumbled upon a very interesting article on CNN. It was called “Why 2013 will be a year of crisis”, written by David Frum (CNN contributor).

I don’t know if you’ve read it, but if you did, I want to ask you something. Didn’t you just feel like nodding with every single sentence you read? Because I found myself doing just that, from top to bottom. In just 600 words, this article sums up an almost morbid prediction about the coming worldwide food crisis.

Here’s just a few key notes:

Prediction: 2013 will be a year of serious global crisis. That crisis is predictable, and in fact has already begun. It will inescapably confront the next president of the United States. “

“The drought has ruined key crops. The corn harvest is expected to drop to the lowest level since 1995. In just July, prices for corn and wheat jumped about 25% each, prices for soybeans about 17%.”

“Surveys for Gallup find that the typical American family is spending one-third less on foodtoday, adjusting for inflation, than in 1969.”

“When grain prices spiked in 2007-2008, bread riots shook 30 countriesacross the developing world, from Haiti to Bangladesh, according to the Financial Times”

And he ends the article with a conclusion that, as David puts it, is anything but reassuring::

“Will 2013 bring us social turmoil in Brazil, strikes in China or revolution in Pakistan? The answer can probably be read in the price indexes of the commodities exchanges — and it is anything but reassuring.

But what about Americans?

Let’s take the average American and put him face to face with the harshest food crisis of the century. Now, I won’t even compare his situation with the sufferance South Africans deal with, as we’re dealing with two completely different worlds here. I’ll just stick to comparing the before the crisis – after the crisis life of a regular Joe.

First, let’s take the root of all evil: the worst drought in 75 years. The media has been raging on this subject for months now, but I personally doubt Americans actually understand what this drought means to our economy (with some exceptions, obviously).

80% of our crops are currently destroyed, but 95% of Americans are still completely unprepared for the coming crisis. I’m sorry, but I’m just going to deem that as sheer ignorance. I just can’t tell what they imagine they’ll be eating in two months’ time… And how they’ll afford it, since prices simply will NOT stop rising.

Last month, predictions said food prices will rise yet another 20% by November… but a surprise came along that forced specialists to change their estimates to the worst:

“U.S. gas prices at highest ever for Labor Day weekend”

gas

source: foxnews.com

On Monday, Gasbuddy.com reported an average of $3.80 per gallon of regular gasoline, “the highest price ever recorded during a Labor Day weekend.”This not only means you’ll be thinking long and hard before taking your car out of the garage… but it also means food prices will shoot for the stars in less than two months’ time!

Never have I imagined thinking of a 20% rise in prices and go “Ah, the good times…”. But knowing what awaits us before the autumn ends, I get shivers down my back… And i’m one of those “preppers” with a solid 3-month stockpile and an indoor garden. And I still worry for the future of my family. After all, who knows how long this crisis will last?

So what will average Joe do just two months from now, when food will no longer be a commodity, but a luxury product? Who will they go to for help? FEMA? Obama? The same people who left “more than 100,000 people without power”after Hurricane Isaac struck on Monday? Days have gone by and those poeple are still in pitch dark as you’re reading this.

So who’s going to take care of 313,000,000 Americans after the food crisis ravages the US?

My friendly advice to you, American patriot: get ready NOW and stock as much food as you can for your family, because you’re going to see some violent riots on the streets of your town…

I honestly hope you’ll stay safe and secure. God help us, cause no one else can!

www.MyFamilySurvivalPlan.com

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