Posts tagged: rice

Where To Buy Bulk Organic Grains For Your Stockpile

Where to Buy Bulk Organic Grains for Your Stockpile

The economic climate has a lot of people scrambling to stock up on food right now. Add to an uncertain job market the food shortage caused by extreme weather conditions across the country, and we could be looking at a perfect storm on the horizon.

Do you read about people’s giant stockpiles of food and wonder, “Where the heck do they find those giant 50-pound bags of grains?” or “How on earth do they afford that extra food on top of the high cost of their day-to-day groceries?”

My inbox has been flooded lately with people looking for ways to rapidly expand their food storage supplies. I wrote about building a 30-day food supply quickly, but honestly, that article is for absolute beginners with no stockpile whatsoever. If you’re working on building a serious, long-term food supply, it’s going to be a lot more cost effective to purchase bulk quantities of high-quality staples.

A lot of us are looking for reliable sources of organic food. The grocery store is not your best bet. Most of the time, they don’t sell in the quantities we’re seeking, and often the quality is low. I personally use Amazon to build my grain stockpile, because it gives me access to a wide range of vendors, many of whom offer free shipping. Below, I’ll list a few of the items that I personally purchase on a regular basis to add to my pantry.

Here’s why grains should be the focus of your bulk purchases.

One of the mainstays of a prepper’s pantry is grains.

I know, you’re thinking, “Wait, I try to avoid grains as much as possible!” It may be true that in your everyday life of working 9-5 in an office, then doing some hobby gardening that grains aren’t as vital, but in a long-term situation, grains are the best way to stock up on storable food. They provide more calories that can be stored for a long time than anything else you can put back.

If you have issues with gluten, don’t despair. There are lots of non-gluten grains you can store. A simple omission of wheat products is the only adjustment you’ll need to make to your stockpile. You can focus more on corn, oats, and rice.

Here are just a few of the reasons that grains are such a valuable addition to your stockpile:

They’re high in carbohydrates. While this might not be desirable in our everyday life right now, in the aftermath of a disaster, you’ll be burning off calories almost as fast as you can consume them.

They’re a great way to extend a meal. How do you feed a family of 4 on what should be one serving of meat? Easy – add it to rice or noodles. It’s an inexpensive way to make the most of pricier ingredients.

They store well for long periods of time. With the exception of brown rice, which has more oils that can go rancid, most grains can last for years if properly stored. They’re the perfect “store it and forget it” food for the pantry.

I strongly recommend organic grains. Yes, they’re more expensive, but they are not doused in pesticides or potentially genetic modified. The high nutritional quality is well worth the added expense. See it as an investment in health.

How many pounds of grains should you store?

Food storage calculators recommend 300 pounds of grains per person for a one year supply. For a family of four, that is a whopping 1200 pounds of food that you should store if you are trying to build a one year pantry!

That sounds like a really daunting number until you remember that it is divided over many different items. Most grains can be purchased in very large quantities at a greatly reduced price. When purchasing in amounts over 20 pounds, your food storage methods become particularly important. When deciding what storage methods you intend to use, you must ask yourself whether you intend for these goods to be your long term food storage, remaining untouched unless disaster strikes, or whether you intend to rotate them from the pantry to the kitchen, using them and replenishing your pantry as needed.

When purchasing in amounts over 20 pounds, your food storage methods become particularly important. When deciding what storage methods you intend to use, you must ask yourself whether you intend for these goods to be your long term food storage, remaining untouched unless disaster strikes, or whether you intend to rotate them from the pantry to the kitchen, using them and replenishing your pantry as needed. Check out this detailed information on food storage methods. Do NOT skimp here. What could be worse than buying all of that food, only to discover it is spoiled or loaded with bugs when you need it the most?

Get good buys by doing your stockpile shopping online.

As I mentioned above, I’ve found that Amazon has a pretty good selection of bulk grains, and many are available in organic varieties. I make a point of ordering at least 20 pounds of a grain each pay period. It’s a nominal amount of money that allows me to build a stockpile of food insurance. Be sure to look for grains with free shipping, though, or the cost could be prohibitive.

When compared with purchasing the same items in smaller quantities at the store, particularly if you opt for the organic, non-GMO varieties, ordering online seems to be the best deal. Ordering online adds the convenience of delivery right to your door if you so desire. I used to order directly from a mill when I lived in Canada, but I had to add shipping costs, as well as a hefty minimum purchase. With resellers like Amazon, you can purchase smaller quantities more frequently, which can mesh better with a tight budget.

Some items are better to purchase locally, however. Pasta, cold cereal, and crackers, to name a few, are generally not the best deals when purchased online, because they can often be found as loss leaders at the grocery store. For those items, watch the flyers for good sales in your area.

What grains should you store?

Following are some of the most common additions to a prepper’s pantry.

I’ve found that I can usually order these online less expensively than I could purchase them in smaller sizes locally, even with the very best of sales going on. I’ve embedded a link into the products, so simply click on the underlined words to go right to the item. All of the items below are things that reside in my own pantry, neatly repackaged into long-term storage containers. At the time of posting this article, they all had free shipping.

Rice

Please, please don’t buy rice from China. While it might be dirt cheap, their food standards are low. You do NOT want your stockpile to be made up of food like that. If you can’t afford organic or eco-farmed (this means there was no use of chemical pesticides but it isn’t certified organic), please buy American-grown rice.

25 pounds of organic brown rice (Lundberg)

25 pounds of eco-farmed white rice

Flour

25 pounds of organic whole wheat flour

25 pounds of organic white flour

Wheat

35 pounds of organic wheat (already in a bucket for long-term storage)

50 pounds of organic winter wheat

Quinoa

25 pounds of organic quinoa

10 pounds of organic red quinoa

Cornmeal

25 pounds of organic corn meal

18 pounds of organic grits

Barley

25 pounds of organic pearled barley

Oats

50 pounds of organic quick-cooking oats

25 pounds of organic steel-cut oats

Bonus: Support American farms!

Nearly all of the recommended products are grown in the USA, with the exception of the quinoa, which is from Bolivia. I was unable to find out where the corn for the grits was grown, but Great River Mill responded to me immediately to let me know that the listed products were all products of American organic farms.

For Canadians:

These products won’t be available to be shipped to Canada. When I lived in Ontario, my favorite resource was this:

Oak Manor Farms

They did not offer free shipping, but the prices were very reasonable and the quality was fantastic.

By Daisy Luther – www.theorganicprepper.ca

Edit – MFSP

10 Foods You Can Store For 100 Years

10 Foods You Can Store For 100 Years

French bread will only last a few days before it goes bad. And canned goods will last you a few years.

So all food has an expiration date, right? Wrong!

Some foods can last a century. Yes, that’s right. A hundred years!

Here are 10 foods that can last (pretty much) forever. In fact, if stored properly, they will never spoil and will stay as fresh as the day you bought them — and will make a great addition to your pantry or emergency food supply.

So feel free to use that 10-pound bag of jasmine rice from 1998 that you were saving for Y2K. As long as it was stored correctly, it’s just as good for you as the day you bought it.

1. Raw Honey

Shelf-life: Indefinite

Honey may crystallize over time, but in terms of safety, this gold liquid is nearly immortal. If it’s stored in a sealed jar, it can last for centuries, according to the National Honey Board. Raw honey has such longevity that it has even been recovered from Egyptian tombs. Honey can sweeten your hot tea, alleviate seasonal allergies, and also can be used to treats wounds and burns. If your honey does crystallize, just place the jar in warm water until the crystals dissolve.

2. Pemmican

Shelf-life: Indefinite

Pemmican was first made by Native-Americans and later by European fur traders and settlers. It was made from the meat of a large game like buffalo, bison, elk or deer. The lean meat was cut into small pieces and dried by putting it over an open fire. Then it was mixed with fat and pressed into little cakes. Sometimes, berries were tossed in for extra flavor. Pemmican makes a great survival food. In fact, it was given in rations and used by British soldiers during the Second Boer War (1899-1902).

Check out the full article: How to make Pemmican – The Ultimate Survival Super-Food

3. Rice

Shelf-life: 30 Years to Indefinite

Rice is the perfect food for storage. And, like honey, has been found perfectly preserved in Egyptian tombs. White, jasmine, wild, Arborio and basmati rice all have an almost indefinite shelf life. White rice is considered by many to be the ultimate survivalist food to stockpile in order to be ready for a food crisis. But brown rice doesn’t have the same good fortune; its high oil content makes it turn rancid faster. Just be sure to store rice in an airtight container to keep out any bugs. I like to put bay leaves in bulk bags of rice to keep the bugs away.

4. Apple Cider Vinegar

Shelf Life: Indefinite

You can buy apple cider vinegar and not worry about it going to waste. So stock up on this healthy condiment and use it for salad dressings, marinades or even household cleaning. And if you feel a sore throat or cold coming on, put a tablespoon in a glass of water and drink it; you’ll feel better!

Learn more about vinegar here >>> 99 Domestic Uses For The Common Vinegar

5. Salt

Shelf Life: Indefinite

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Image source: UCHealth.com

Sea salt is the healthiest salt, but regular table salt is fine. Salt adds taste, preserves meat and helps food keep its texture. And if stored properly, it will never go bad. In the event of a grid failure, salt makes a great way to cure meat. Here is what one source says:

“Historically, brining and salting have been used as a method to preserve meat. Some methods were as simple as submerging the meat in a barrel of salt water. The salt solution was judged ready when it would float a raw egg. This solution would require approximately 8 pounds of salt to 5 gallons of water. Cover the meat completely with the solution and leave covered until ready to use. From the amount of salt, it requires you can see that it pays to store a substantial amount.”  Read more interesting facts about salt here >>>27 More Reasons To Stock Salt

6. Vanilla Extract

Shelf Life: Indefinite

Made from dried, cured vanilla beans, the pure vanilla extract has a sweet, rich flavor. And since it’s made from alcohol, the pure vanilla extract will stay fresh and flavorful forever. However, imitation vanilla does not have the same lifespan, so make sure that you buy the more expensive vanilla extract. From cookies to cupcakes, the pure vanilla extract is usually used for baking. But historically, it was used to treat burns, cuts, and wounds.

7. Sugar

Shelf Life: Indefinite

White, brown and powdered sugar will last forever. If it hardens over time, you can break up the chunks by warming it up and stirring it, just like with honey. Sugar doesn’t support bacterial growth, but don’t forget to store it in an airtight container to keep the bugs and moisture out. And sugar can be used for more than just a sweet treat — it makes a great scrub to use on your face and body.

8. Soy Sauce

Shelf Life: Indefinite

As long as it’s never opened, soy sauce will last forever. Soy sauce is made from fermented soybeans, salt, wheat, and water. The high sodium content of soy sauce helps to preserve it. But if you’re gluten intolerant, make sure that you buy a soy sauce that is gluten-free. From stir-fries to soups, soy sauce is an important ingredient in Asian recipes. My favorite way to eat soy sauce is to make a quick sauce by mixing ¼ cup of honey, ¼ cup of water, and 2 tablespoons of soy sauce. It makes a great stir-fry sauce or glazes for chicken.

9. Bouillon

Shelf Life: Indefinite

Because bouillon has large amounts of salt, it can last a long time. However, over time, the taste of the bouillon can be altered. So if storing bouillon cubes, it’s best to use a food sealer or seal in Mylar bags. It makes a great survival food used in broth or soup to deliver much-needed electrolytes to the body. I use it often in soups and stews; it’s a great way to save money and keep food costs low.

Flu Shot

10. Powdered Milk in nitrogen packed cans

Shelf Life: 25 Years to Indefinite

In a difficult situation, powdered milk makes an emergency source of calcium and vitamin D for young children. It can last indefinitely in nitrogen-packed cans and can be placed in the freezer. And if the powdered milk develops an odor or turns yellow, it’s time to discard.

So whether you’re planning for a disaster or simply want to have a pantry stocked with non-perishable food for an unexpected snowstorm, having these 10 food items is important. And if you store these foods properly, they might just last forever.

What foods do you keep stocked that will last forever? Write your response in the comments below:

By Kimberlee Hertzer

www.offthegridnews.com

Sturdy Staples: 9 Foods That Can Outlast You