Survival First Aid Kit Tutorial

Survival Medicine 101 Tutorial Part 1: The First Aid Kit

I’m not a doctor, but I believe it’s absolutely crucial to know the basics of emergency medicine. One day, your family might depend on your knowledge. And the little you know about it may just save your kids’ life.



Unfortunately, most people leave this subject to doctors and survival experts, assuming it’s just as difficult as going to med school or something. But here’s the thing: difficult or not, when your loved ones are in danger and you are some time or distance away from professional medical care, you’d better know a thing or two about emergency medicine or you’ll just have to watch them suffer, helplessly.

So here are some of the easiest life-savings techniques that you should know in case of a disaster or crisis. Today, we’re going to start with the first aid kit.



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Most survival websites, such as cdtactical.com or www.survival-gear.com recommend getting three different types of kits:

#1: The basic first aid kit

According to www.isu.edu, it should contain:

  • Moleskin
  • Sterile pads (different sizes)
  • Sterile Gauze
  • Neosporin
  • Bandaids
  • Aspirin
  • First Aid Tape

You can put it in your car and/or in your bug-out bag. Make sure you have enough items for your whole family. If you have little children, put some sterile pads and bandaids in their packs, too, and teach them how to use them. However, don’t give them any pills or items that could hurt them (like scissors or first aid tape, which they can suffocate on).

#2: An intermediate kit

This one is for your home or for traveling and should contain:

  • Bandages
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Gauze pads
  • Iodine or similar prep pads
  • Alcohol prep pads
  • Butterfly bandages
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Medical adhesive tape
  • Aspirin and/or non-aspirin pain relievers

cdtactical.com suggests you should also include the following:

  • Larger adhesive bandages (for larger wounds)
  • Smelling salts or ammonia inhalants (in case someone faints)
  • Ace-type bandages (for strains and sprains)
  • Rolls of gauze (in case you need to change bandages)
  • Antiseptic towelettes (to keep the wound clean)
  • Snake bite poison extractor (this one’s optional, but who knows when you might need it)
  • Thermometer
  • Tweezers
  • Safety pins
  • Moleskin
  • Rubber (latex) gloves
  • Burn medication
  • Anti-itch treatment
  • Sun screen
  • Diarrhea medication
  • Eye drops
  • Basic first aid instructions (this one is definitely a MUST)

Some of the above are optional. You may not find them crucial or they may be hard to find/expensive. You choose what your family needs the most and make your own customized kit. The more you include, the more worst case scenarios you cover.

#3: The advanced emergency kit

This one is crucial when someone is severely injured or ill, but you’ve got no access to a hospital.

The advanced emergency kit should include the intermediate kit PLUS:

  • Special bandages, such as conforming, trauma, and field dressings
  • Rubbing alcohol for sterilization
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Betadine
  • Scissors
  • Forceps
  • Scalpels
  • Hemostats
  • Sterile sutures, in several sizes
  • Wound probe
  • Mouth-to-mouth shield
  • Instant hot pack
  • Instant cold pack
  • Prep pads
  • Eye pads
  • Sponges
  • Cotton balls
  • Burn treatments
  • Dental tools
  • Splint materials
  • In-depth first aid/surgical guide
  • Cold medication
  • Decongestant
  • Antihistamine
  • Colloidal silver
  • Broad spectrum antibiotic
  • Antibiotics for sinus infections, strep throat and other common “winter” ailments
  • Painkillers

Now, you may wonder what you’ll do with a forceps or a scalpel, but there two possible options:

1. You find a doctor who needs these instruments to do his job.

2. You have to BE an improvised doctor until you can find a hospital. In some cases, a superficial, amateur job can save a life.

One more thing about the advanced emergency kit: make a list with all the chronic illnesses you and your family members suffer from. Then add at least a 3-day supply of meds for each one of them.

That’s it for today. I’ll be back with more life-saving info next week. Until then, stay safe!

www.myfamilysurvivalplan.com

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One Response to Survival First Aid Kit Tutorial

  • Excellent lists! Your point of making the list of chronic illnesses and meds was a valuable addition. We should not be too scared of doing what needs to be done when there's no one else to do it, especially when the alternative is death.

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