Category: Food Storage

Where To Buy Bulk Organic Grains For Your Stockpile

Where to Buy Bulk Organic Grains for Your Stockpile

The economic climate has a lot of people scrambling to stock up on food right now. Add to an uncertain job market the food shortage caused by extreme weather conditions across the country, and we could be looking at a perfect storm on the horizon.

Do you read about people’s giant stockpiles of food and wonder, “Where the heck do they find those giant 50-pound bags of grains?” or “How on earth do they afford that extra food on top of the high cost of their day-to-day groceries?”

My inbox has been flooded lately with people looking for ways to rapidly expand their food storage supplies. I wrote about building a 30-day food supply quickly, but honestly, that article is for absolute beginners with no stockpile whatsoever. If you’re working on building a serious, long-term food supply, it’s going to be a lot more cost effective to purchase bulk quantities of high-quality staples.

A lot of us are looking for reliable sources of organic food. The grocery store is not your best bet. Most of the time, they don’t sell in the quantities we’re seeking, and often the quality is low. I personally use Amazon to build my grain stockpile, because it gives me access to a wide range of vendors, many of whom offer free shipping. Below, I’ll list a few of the items that I personally purchase on a regular basis to add to my pantry.

Here’s why grains should be the focus of your bulk purchases.

One of the mainstays of a prepper’s pantry is grains.

I know, you’re thinking, “Wait, I try to avoid grains as much as possible!” It may be true that in your everyday life of working 9-5 in an office, then doing some hobby gardening that grains aren’t as vital, but in a long-term situation, grains are the best way to stock up on storable food. They provide more calories that can be stored for a long time than anything else you can put back.

If you have issues with gluten, don’t despair. There are lots of non-gluten grains you can store. A simple omission of wheat products is the only adjustment you’ll need to make to your stockpile. You can focus more on corn, oats, and rice.

Here are just a few of the reasons that grains are such a valuable addition to your stockpile:

They’re high in carbohydrates. While this might not be desirable in our everyday life right now, in the aftermath of a disaster, you’ll be burning off calories almost as fast as you can consume them.

They’re a great way to extend a meal. How do you feed a family of 4 on what should be one serving of meat? Easy – add it to rice or noodles. It’s an inexpensive way to make the most of pricier ingredients.

They store well for long periods of time. With the exception of brown rice, which has more oils that can go rancid, most grains can last for years if properly stored. They’re the perfect “store it and forget it” food for the pantry.

I strongly recommend organic grains. Yes, they’re more expensive, but they are not doused in pesticides or potentially genetic modified. The high nutritional quality is well worth the added expense. See it as an investment in health.

How many pounds of grains should you store?

Food storage calculators recommend 300 pounds of grains per person for a one year supply. For a family of four, that is a whopping 1200 pounds of food that you should store if you are trying to build a one year pantry!

That sounds like a really daunting number until you remember that it is divided over many different items. Most grains can be purchased in very large quantities at a greatly reduced price. When purchasing in amounts over 20 pounds, your food storage methods become particularly important. When deciding what storage methods you intend to use, you must ask yourself whether you intend for these goods to be your long term food storage, remaining untouched unless disaster strikes, or whether you intend to rotate them from the pantry to the kitchen, using them and replenishing your pantry as needed.

When purchasing in amounts over 20 pounds, your food storage methods become particularly important. When deciding what storage methods you intend to use, you must ask yourself whether you intend for these goods to be your long term food storage, remaining untouched unless disaster strikes, or whether you intend to rotate them from the pantry to the kitchen, using them and replenishing your pantry as needed. Check out this detailed information on food storage methods. Do NOT skimp here. What could be worse than buying all of that food, only to discover it is spoiled or loaded with bugs when you need it the most?

Get good buys by doing your stockpile shopping online.

As I mentioned above, I’ve found that Amazon has a pretty good selection of bulk grains, and many are available in organic varieties. I make a point of ordering at least 20 pounds of a grain each pay period. It’s a nominal amount of money that allows me to build a stockpile of food insurance. Be sure to look for grains with free shipping, though, or the cost could be prohibitive.

When compared with purchasing the same items in smaller quantities at the store, particularly if you opt for the organic, non-GMO varieties, ordering online seems to be the best deal. Ordering online adds the convenience of delivery right to your door if you so desire. I used to order directly from a mill when I lived in Canada, but I had to add shipping costs, as well as a hefty minimum purchase. With resellers like Amazon, you can purchase smaller quantities more frequently, which can mesh better with a tight budget.

Some items are better to purchase locally, however. Pasta, cold cereal, and crackers, to name a few, are generally not the best deals when purchased online, because they can often be found as loss leaders at the grocery store. For those items, watch the flyers for good sales in your area.

What grains should you store?

Following are some of the most common additions to a prepper’s pantry.

I’ve found that I can usually order these online less expensively than I could purchase them in smaller sizes locally, even with the very best of sales going on. I’ve embedded a link into the products, so simply click on the underlined words to go right to the item. All of the items below are things that reside in my own pantry, neatly repackaged into long-term storage containers. At the time of posting this article, they all had free shipping.

Rice

Please, please don’t buy rice from China. While it might be dirt cheap, their food standards are low. You do NOT want your stockpile to be made up of food like that. If you can’t afford organic or eco-farmed (this means there was no use of chemical pesticides but it isn’t certified organic), please buy American-grown rice.

25 pounds of organic brown rice (Lundberg)

25 pounds of eco-farmed white rice

Flour

25 pounds of organic whole wheat flour

25 pounds of organic white flour

Wheat

35 pounds of organic wheat (already in a bucket for long-term storage)

50 pounds of organic winter wheat

Quinoa

25 pounds of organic quinoa

10 pounds of organic red quinoa

Cornmeal

25 pounds of organic corn meal

18 pounds of organic grits

Barley

25 pounds of organic pearled barley

Oats

50 pounds of organic quick-cooking oats

25 pounds of organic steel-cut oats

Bonus: Support American farms!

Nearly all of the recommended products are grown in the USA, with the exception of the quinoa, which is from Bolivia. I was unable to find out where the corn for the grits was grown, but Great River Mill responded to me immediately to let me know that the listed products were all products of American organic farms.

For Canadians:

These products won’t be available to be shipped to Canada. When I lived in Ontario, my favorite resource was this:

Oak Manor Farms

They did not offer free shipping, but the prices were very reasonable and the quality was fantastic.

By Daisy Luther – www.theorganicprepper.ca

Edit – MFSP

10 Incredible Off-Grid Uses For Diatomaceous Earth

10 Incredible Off-Grid Uses For Diatomaceous Earth

Diatomaceous earth (DE) is an all-natural chalky, soft powder formed from the microscopic fossilized remains of ancient single-celled animals, called diatoms. If you haven’t heard of diatomaceous earth and some of its amazing uses in and around your home, get ready to have one of those hand-against-your-forehead who-would-have-thought moments.

Making up about 26 percent of the earth’s crust, DE is found in sediments from rivers, lakes, streams and oceans all over the world. It is almost 90 percent silica, which is found in human hair, skin, and nails. When viewed through a microscope, DE looks like a tube with holes in it. It is very hard, has a very strong negative charge and contains about 20 trace minerals. Note that there is a considerable difference between food grade and non-food grade DE, with the food-grade being considered much safer to use in a wider variety of applications.

The FDA classifies food-grade DE as safe, and it has an amazing amount of uses and benefits. Here is a list of our Top 10:

1. Toothpaste. DE has abrasive properties and is an effective natural alternative to commercial chemical-laden toothpaste. Just add your own natural flavoring, such as mint, and sprinkle a little DE on your toothbrush. DE also works to control bad breath.

Want The Best Chemical-Free, All-Natural Insecticide — For Your Garden AND Home?

2. Deodorant. Are you ready to stop using antiperspirants which interfere with your body’s natural detox system, but baking soda, a common alternative, leaves you with a rash? Here’s a recipe to try that uses DE.

Ingredients

• 3/4 cup arrowroot powder or cornstarch
• 1/4 cup food grade DE
• 5-7 tablespoons melted coconut oil

Directions

• Combine DE and arrowroot powder or cornstarch.
• Add 5 tablespoons melted coconut oil and mix well with a fork. Continue adding coconut oil until desired consistency.
• Transfer mixture to a jar with a tight-fitting lid.

Using your fingertips, apply a small amount to underarms as needed.

3. Facial Scrub. Because of its high mineral content, DE makes a gentle facial scrub and facial mask.

Directions: Mix about 1 tablespoon of DE with water, Aloe Vera juice or slightly diluted honey to make a thick paste. Lightly massage the paste onto your face using your fingertips and small, circular motions. Allow the paste to set for two minutes, before removing with a warm washcloth using similar circular motions. Avoid using this scrub near the eyes or on irritated or chapped skin.

DE

4. Food storage. Add DE to your stored grains and legumes to help keep them dry, to keep away pests and to prevent spoilage.

5. Pest control. Food grade DE can be used to eliminate bed bugs, fleas, roaches, spiders, earwigs and garden pests such as slugs and beetles. Around the inside of your home, try sprinkling it into cracks and crevices where bugs can enter.

6. Kitchen deodorizer. Place a small container of DE in your fridge and freezer to reduce or eliminate unpleasant odors. Replace every few weeks or as needed. DE also is useful in neutralizing garbage can odors. Sprinkle some in the bottom of your can.

7. Metal Cleaner. Make a simple paste of DE and water to use as a metal polish. It also works well as a soft scrub for the shower, tub, and sink.

8. Driveway oil stains. To remove unsightly stains from your garage floor or driveway, sprinkle the affected area with enough DE to cover it completely. Let the powder soak up the oil for about 24 hours before removing the excess with a scraper and then sweeping away the remains.

9. Shoe odor. Place DE inside a nylon knee-high and tie the top end shut. Place inside shoe or boot to help absorb unpleasant odor when not wearing.

10. Carpet cleaner. Sprinkle DE on carpet stains and lightly work the powder into it before letting it set for several hours. Then vacuum.

In addition to its home uses, many people use food grade DE as a nutritional supplement, primarily for bone and joint health, and as a detoxifying agent.

What are your favorite uses for diatomaceous earth? Leave your reply in the section below:

By Tricia Drevets – www.offthegridnews.com

Image For Pinterest:

10 Incredible Off-Grid Uses For Diatomaceous Earth
Graphic – www.myfamilysurvivalplan.com. Images – Pixabay (PD), Wikipedia (PD)

How To Make Pemmican: The Ultimate Survival Super-Food

How To Make Pemmican – The Ultimate Survival Super-Food

Invented by the natives of North America, pemmican was used by Indian scouts as well as early western explorers. These people spent a great deal of time on the go and depended on having portable, high-energy, highly nutritious, and filling foods that would last for long periods of time.

Pemmican was light, compact, high in protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, and if done properly can last anywhere from a few years (decades) up to a lifetime without refrigeration!

Pemmican consists of lean, dried meat which is crushed to a powder and mixed with hot, rendered fat. Back in those days, the natives made it with bison, deer, or elk but nowadays it is usually made with beef. Crushed, dried berries can be added as well.

A man could subsist entirely on pemmican, drawing on the fat for energy, the protein for strength and vitamins for health. There are a few cases in history of people living for months in good health with only pemmican.

So, it’s easy to understand why I choose pemmican as the ultimate survival-superfood.

People really should avert their gaze from the modern survival thinking for just a bit and also look at how the guys who wandered the west 130 or so years ago did it. As I’ve said it in a recent article (30 Lost Ways of Survival from 1880) the “SHTF” we all prep for is what folks 150 years ago called “daily life:” No electrical power, no refrigerators, no Internet, no computers, no TV, no hyper-active law enforcement, no Safeway or Walmart.

70 howtos for your preps

How to Make Pemmican

You’ll need:

• 4 cups lean meat or a pound (deer, beef, caribou or moose)
• 3 cups blueberries (or other dried fruits)
• 2 cups rendered fat (or 1/2 pounds)
• Optional – unsalted nuts and about 1 shot of honey

Get about a pound and a half of lean, grass-fed shoulder roast and let it firm up in the freezer so you can slice it thin.

Pemmican-1

Add salt and pepper. Set the oven to the lowest possible temperature (around 150 degrees) and put the strips of meat directly onto the rack. Crack the oven door to prevent moisture buildup.

At this point, you can also put a handful of frozen wild blueberries on a small oven pan to dry out with the meat.

Let the meat dry out for about fifteen hours, or until it is crispy. Toss it in the food processor until it becomes a powder. Do the same with the blueberries. In the old days, they’d pound it with a rock to turn it into a “powder”.

Pemmican-3

For the fat portion of pemmican, you can use tallow (rendered beef or mutton fat) or lard (rendered pork fat). Cut up your fat into small pieces and place the fat into the crockpot. Set the crockpot on low heat and remove it only after it becomes completely liquid. Use a strainer to avoid all the crispy bits; you just want the pure, liquid fat.

make your own aspirin

Pemmican-2

Mix the meat and berry powder together, then slowly add the hot liquid fat. Pour just enough so that the fat soaks into the powder – slowly.

Pemmican-5

Let it firm up, then cut it into squares or roll it into a ball.

If done and stored correctly it can last for decades. Wrap these “pemmican balls” in wax paper and store them in a ziplock bag in a cool, dark place.

Back in 1800, the native people Canada (Metis) would go southwest onto the prairie, slaughter buffalo, convert it into pemmican and carry it north to trade at the North West Company posts. For these people on the edge of the prairie, the pemmican trade was as important a source of trade goods as was the fur trade for the Indians further north. And this is because, for a serious journey, almost all foods would have been too heavy to carry.

If you’ll ever have to bug out – especially without a car – keep this in mind: Pemmican is the most compact, light, natural and nutritious supply you can take with you.

By C. Davis

www.askaprepper.com

Flu Shot