Category: Reuse

10 Uses For Coca Cola You Weren’t Aware Of

10 Uses For Coca Cola You Weren’t Aware Of

This family-friendly soft drink has been around for over a century. It originated in US Georgia as a medicine drink at the end of the 19th century (invented by John Pemberton), but a few years later (at the beginning of the 20th century) it was bought and rebranded by a businessman (Asa Griggs Candler) to become the longest-standing and most common brand in the world. Its popularity is indisputable. We might not all like it, but we all know it and we all tried it at least once. Believe it or not, Coke can be used for many other reasons, apart from human consumption. Due to its interesting properties, the fizzy drink in question can be very handy around the house. You can use it to clean stuff, defrost surfaces and even as a pesticide. It’s still up for debate whether the drink is harmful to humans or not, but this is a discussion for another time. Don’t drink it if you don’t trust it, but take a look at this 10 uses for coca cola, the wonders it can do in everyday life situations.

1. Rust remover

Coke is a fizzy drink, and it’s filled with phosphoric acid, which can loosen rust from every surface as long as that object is exposed for a long enough period of time. If we’re talking about rusty tools or other pieces of metal that you’re trying to clean up, you can simply fill a recipient that’s big enough with Coke and place the object you wish to clean inside. Let it stir for a while; after you’ll take it out the rust will be easy to clean if you scrub it with some tin foil and wipe off with a cloth (works especially well on chromed surfaces). It also does wonders on rusty bolts: just spill some cola over the bolt, let it sit, wipe it and give it another go. You’ll be amazed at how well it works.

2. Oil stain remover

Oil stains are a pain in the neck. It takes only a moment of carelessness for your pavement or garage floor to get stained forever. If you’ve dropped that pesky motor oil (or any type of oily substance for that matter) and made a mess, don’t worry. Just go out and buy a Coca Cola bottle. Spill it over the oil stain and give it a couple of hours to work its magic. When you’re done waiting, simply whose off the stain from the pavement. Because it works so great, some people even use Coke to clean their car engine’s; and with great results too.

3. Pots and pans cleaner

If you have old and burned pots and pans that have been worn out with time but you still can’t let them go, you’ll be happy to know that a Coke treatment can make them (almost) brand new. To remove those pesky burn stains, simply pour the wonder-soda into the damaged pot or pan and simmer for a while. After you’re done, empty the pot or pan and rinse with water. Wipe it clean and there you have it! Coca Cola works not only for burned spots but also for cleaning all sorts of build-ups and scales.

4. Coin cleaner

If you’re a hardcore coin collector and want to make your new additions shine like there’s no tomorrow, just fill a glass or jar with Coca Cola and dump the coins in. In about 10 -20 minutes the excess muck will have been dissolved, so dump the soda and take the coins out one by one and wipe them clean. They’ll be shiny and clean.

5. Defroster

The soda does wonders for defrosting any type of surface, as the acidic compounds melt ice in no time. So defrosting your car windows (or any type of window for that matter) will be no problem at all. Just pour the drink all over the windshield/windows etc. and watch the ice melt in under a minute. After the ice is turned to mush, you can just wipe it off with a cloth or just let it come off on its own in a matter of minutes.

6. Window cleaner

It can clean windows just as well as it can defrost them. It’s good for any shiny surface for that matter, thanks to the high amount of citric acid it holds. Normal window cleaners are citric acid-based as well, so there’s not much difference. You can pour Coke over a piece of cloth and wipe the windows with it or put Coke inside a spray bottle, spray it all over and then wipe the surface clean. The choice is up to you, but the outcome will be the same: cleanliness.

7. Stain remover

It works perfectly well as any other expensive stain remover available on the market. You can pour the soda in the wash, alongside detergent and it will work just fine in removing the stains from your clothes. Also, wine stains or blood stains from carpets or similar surfaces won’t be a problem if you pour coke on them as soon as possible. This procedure is not recommended for light fabrics because Coca Cola is brown. It might remove the red, but it will leave a brown spot in its place.

8. Toilette cleaner

If you’re out of toilette cleaner but you happen to have some Coca Cola lying around the house, perfect! Just pour the soda into the toilette bowl and let it sit for a few minutes, just like you would with your regular product. After the time is up, scrub and flush like always. Your bowl will be so sparkly, that no one will be able to tell that you used a fizzy drink instead of a professional product.

9. Gum remover

If by some reason or another you end up with gum in your hair, the only reasonable thing to do is to cut it off. Well, not really. Just pour some Coke over the “warzone” and wait about 5 minutes. The fizzy drink will break down the stretching properties of the gum and it will make it much easier to pick up and wash off.

10. Pain reliever

IF you get stung by some nasty creatures (bees, wasp, jellyfish etc.) you’ll be a world of pain. You probably know the main approach to jellyfish stings is urine treatment. Fortunately, making a fool of yourself in public won’t be necessary if you happen to have some Coca Cola on you. Just open the bottle or can and pour it over the affected area. Thanks to the chemical structure of the drink, the pain-inducing substances will be neutralized a couple of minutes.

Whether you like Coke as a drink or not, is not up for debate. But having some around the house will undoubtedly come in handy at some point or another. I always keep a couple of bottles, just in case. You never know when you’ll run out of cleaning props or pain relief ointments.

By My Family Survival Plan

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10 Uses For Coca Cola You Weren’t Aware Of
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3 Of The Most Common And Dangerous Foodborne Diseases

Food! We all do it, we all eat. Not only because we have to in order to survive, but also because we like it. Most cultures are unique when it comes to culinary treats, with at least a couple of dishes to set them easily aside from the rest of the world. Cooking may come in different shapes and sizes, but the raw material is (more or less) the same everywhere. We need organic material as fuel. But the organic material we ingurgitate may sometimes be infected by pathogens that will cause us harm. The food or beverages that contain certain bacteria, viruses, parasites or even chemicals will cause great distress and irritation to the gastrointestinal tract. Most of the gastrointestinal afflictions are acute; they manifest themselves rapidly, with fever diarrhea and vomiting and won’t last more than a few days, even without medical treatment. Others, on the other hand, will manifest themselves way more severely and will cause a rapid death if left untreated.

Salmonella

Salmonella enterica

This tiny bacterium (Salmonella enterica) is one of the most common and wildly spread foodborne pathogens on the face of the Earth. It lives in the intestinal tracts of animals and it’s transmitted to humans through food that hasn’t been properly washed and that previously came in contact with animal waste. What makes it dangerous and so wildly spread is the fact that it’s practically impossible to detect. Diseased animals manifest no exact symptoms; nor will the food products that get tainted. It’s not resistant to high temperatures, so cooking the food properly will destroy the proteins that make up the bacteria. If not, hell will soon follow. Within 12 to 72 hours from infection, the pathogen will make itself “visible” through acute abdominal pain and cramp, fever and diarrhea. The diarrhea is severe in this case, so drinking plenty of fluids is a must, in order to avoid dehydration. In a strong and healthy individual, the disease shouldn’t last more than 5 – 7 days. Medication is necessary only if the infection has already spread to the intestines; also if the infected person has a compromised immune system or is an elderly citizen, that will have problems fighting the disease on his own. It can sometimes lead to a complication known as Reiter’s syndrome or reactive arthritis, which causes painful joints, painful urination, eye soreness and chronic arthritis. The best way to avoid salmonella infection is it to cook your food carefully, especially meat and eggs.

Trichinosis

Trichinella spiralis cysts in muscle mass

Also known as trichinellosis, is a disease that’s easily contracted by humans that consume meat infected with the larvae of the trichinella worm (Trichinella spiralis), be it from domesticated pigs or other wild animals. The larvae are incased in a cyst in animal meat. After ingestion, it gets in a human host, where the digestive acids found in our stomachs dissolve the cyst and release the worm. They mature in a couple of days in the small intestine. They will mate, lay eggs and from these eggs small worm will result that will make their way to muscle tissue (through the arteries), where they’ll incase themselves in cystic form again. In an attempt to fight the invasive creatures, you’ll body will suffer nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, acute stomachaches in the first 2 – 3 days after eating the tainted meat. After the worms have matured and start reproducing (2 – 8 weeks), you’ll also experience fever, chills, coughing, eye-sealing, headaches, itchy skin, joint pain and irregularities of the digestive system (constipation or diarrhea). It’s a disease that should not be left untreated. The best way to avoid getting trichinosis is to cook meat at about 160°F, a temperature that will destroy the cysts. You can also freeze you pork for 20 days in order to kill the worms, however, this might not work when it comes to game animals.

E.coli

The O157:H7 E. coli

The Escherichia coli is a large group of bacteria, out of which most are harmless. The one that’s able to cause havoc is called the O157:H7, and is part of the STEC group (the E. coli that produce the Shiga toxin). They’re mostly found in the intestines and stomachs of ruminant animals (cattle) but also in sheep, goats, elk, deer etc. When the animal is eviscerated, the intestines might get cut and spill out on the meat, immediately infecting it. The most common method of spreading the bacteria is through ground meat, but it was also found in milk and other dairy products. Vegetables or fruits that come in contact with infected animal waste will also get tainted. Although it doesn’t manifest itself in any way in the animal hosts, in humans it can cause fever, nausea, vomiting, cramps and even bloody diarrhea. The infection spreads rapidly, so that about a third of the people infected will get hospitalized; about 10% of those that get hospitalized will die. It’s most dangerous when it comes to children ages 5 – 10. They risk of developing hemolytic-uremic syndrome as a result of the E. coli infection, which can lead to kidney failure. You can avoid E. coli infection by regularly washing your hands, washing vegetables and cooking your meat at a temperature of at least 160°F.

To avoid getting dangerous foodborne diseases, hygiene is a must. Always wash your hands, your food and avoid eating from unreliable sources. If you manifest any of the symptoms that I’ve listed above, check with your doctor immediately and don’t leave anything to chance. Most of the incipient symptoms are common in most type of food-related infections, so it’s hard to tell on your own whether you’ve contracted something that’s life-threatening or not.

By My Family Survival Plan

17 Great Ways To Utilize 2-Liter Soda Bottles For Survival

17 Great Ways To Utilize 2-Liter Soda Bottles For Survival

I’ll admit it, I’m a huge fan of the ubiquitous 2-liter soda bottles. And like 5-gallon buckets, I think they’re far too under-utilized by preppers. In fact, 2-liter soda bottles can be used in a variety of ways and I would imagine I’m only grazing the surface here. The best part is that they’re 100% free. Here are 17 ways I think you can re-purpose a simple 2-liter soda bottle, enjoy…

1. Block of ice – I’d imagine many of you expect to keep your refrigerated food viable for longer using ice in coolers. You can easily accomplish this by freezing water in 2-liter soda bottles creating a nice block of ice. Just be sure to fill it about 90% full to avoid bursting the soda bottle since water expands as it freezes.

2. Emergency drinking water – When that block of ice melts, you now have a portable source of potable drinking water. I would suggest you clean the bottle first with soap and water and then simply fill it with tap water. Of course, you don’t have to freeze water stored in 2-liter soda bottles but it’s a nice benefit. Beyond that, they’re FDA-approved, shouldn’t degrade, and very durable. It’s a win-win.

3. SODIS – Now, when they’re no longer a viable block of ice and you’ve consumed the water inside, you can still make use of 2-liter soda bottles to disinfect any collected water using the SODIS method. Granted, there are some considerations, such as the bottle must be clear for this to work, but I’m positive you’ll love these bottles even more once you learn how.

4. Food storage (short term) – I’ve seen many people suggest that you can easily store food in a 2-liter bottle (video) and while I agree, it’s not a 100% perfect solution and shouldn’t be considered viable for long-term foods. That said, could you easily store bulk foods for years on end without trouble? Sure. I wouldn’t worry too much about it at all.

5. Fruit fly and wasp trap – We’ve used 2-liter soda bottles for years as a very successful gnat and fruit fly trap inside the house. You can also use them to trap wasps (video) as well.

6. Hand washing station – You can easily makeshift a hand washing station by hanging a 2-liter soda bottle upside-down and unscrewing the cap ever-so-slightly such that a trickle of water escapes thereby allowing you to wash your hands and conserve water.

7. Fish trap – Though I’ve never tried this one, apparently you can create a makeshift fish trap too.

8. Water filter – Create your own biosand filter (video) in nearly any container, including a 2-liter soda bottle. Just pile the appropriate amounts of gravel, activated charcoal, and sand and you’ll have a viable makeshift water filter in no time! Well, you do have to wait a week or two for the biolayer to form but, hey, who’s counting?

9. Mini greenhouse – If you’re trying to get your plants started in the spring but are unsure about the weather, you can cut the bottom off a 2-liter soda bottle and help to protect vulnerable plants.

10. Upside-down planter – Bored with growing your plants right-side up? No problem! Flip it around like this (video).

11. Self-watering container – Similar to grow buckets, you can make your own self-watering mini-grow bucket using a 2-liter soda bottle.

12. Drip irrigation – Here’s something else I’ve never tried but I hear you can make your own drip irrigation system.

13. Boil water – Here’s something else I’ve never actually tried but apparently you can suspend a bottle of water over a campfire and boil water so long as the flames don’t lick the bottle. I’ve also heard that you can actually put a completely full bottle of water (with the cap on) in a campfire and not melt the bottle… that remains to be tested.

14. Water bailer/scoop – Again, cut the bottom off and now you have a water bailer or. You could also cut it at an angle and turn that same water bottle into a makeshift scoop for grains or whatever you like.

15. Makeshift funnel – As with the above suggestion, cut the bottom off but remove the cap and you have a nice, free, funnel.

16. Makeshift pillow – I know this is stretching it a bit but you could rest a weary head atop an inflated soda bottle. I know it’s not a comfy down pillow but it sure beats a hard rock.

17. Emergency floating device – Tie a few of these together (inflated and with the caps) and you’ve got a makeshift floatation device.

So, what uses can you think of? I would love to hear them!

By Damian Brindle

www.rethinksurvival.com