Posts tagged: panic

Prepare Your Mind For The Coming Crisis – Part 6 –

Mind Preparedness
Registered to Alec Deacon

Coping with negative feelings: Anxiety, Panic and Fear

These three powerful emotions — anxiety, panic and fear — are common during any disaster or crisis and act just like the pieces of a domino.

First, anxiety sets in. It’s like a dark premonition of what is bound to happen. If the premonition turns out to be true, panic is next to take over. It’s a normal state in case of emergency situation, but if you don’t control it, it can easily turn into fear. And more often than not, fear leads to deadly mistakes that endanger your life and your whole family,

So let’s take these negative emotions one by one and see what you can do to avoid the “domino syndrome”:

#1: Anxiety

Anxiety is a universal human reaction, usually caused by major changes. Most people are resistant to change, as it threatens a habitat we’ve already grown accustomed to. It can also be translated into “fear of the unknown”.

Many people have troubles identifying the cause of their anxiety. This is the main difference between anxiety and fear. The latter is a stronger reaction to a specific, known cause. However, in times of disaster or crisis, causes of anxiety are usually obvious. But that’s not necessarily a good thing, as it can more easily turn into panic and then fear.

So what can you do to prevent panic from setting in? At the first sign of anxiety, take a moment to clearly identify the cause. After doing so, think of a way to eliminate the cause, step-by-step. Visualise yourself taking every step successfully. Then get to action and take every step of the way to eliminate the cause of your anxiety.

#2: Panic

If your anxiety does turn to panic, however, you must work harder on reducing this overwhelming feeling. Otherwise, you might just end up endangering your life or your family’s because you acted out of sheer panic.

So when you feel panic taking over, the first thing to do is sit down (in a safe place) and breathe deeply for 10 seconds. Try not to think of anything, just clear your head, it will help you focus. Then remember the basic survival techniques you’ve read or heard of that can save your life in that specific situation (an earthquake, an attack, a riot etc).

Breathe deeply at all times, unless you’re under a chemical or biological attack or you might choke on smoke. Breathing deeply and rhythmically will keep you calm and help you focus on your mission: survival.

#3: Fear

The difference between panic and fear lies in their intensity. Panic is a feeling that first takes control of your mind and then leads to a physical reaction. Fear is such a strong feeling that your mind immediately sends a stimuli to your body, forcing it to act irrationally.

This is not necessarily a bad thing. A lot of people were saved due to their instant reactions to danger. However, when it comes to an emergency situation you’ve never experienced before, your mind does not know how to react. So it usually forces your body either to run, or to freeze. And if you’re dealing with an earthquake, a flood or a terrorist attack, neither of these two will do you any good.

So what you can do is GET INFORMED! Read everything about the most common disasters in your area, but also about situations that may occur anywhere in the world: chemical and biological attacks, nuclear attacks and fallout or how to survive a violent mob and keep looters out of your home.

Every weekend, have an emergency drill with your family. One week, it can be for earthquakes, the next one for burglaries and so on. It may seem a bit crazy to your neighbors and even to some members of your family, but remember this: when a disaster does strike, you’ll be so familiar with these survival techniques, they’ll come naturally. And this means you can use fear to your advantage and save your family, while the ones who laughed at you will be making dangerous mistakes every 10 seconds.

I’ll get back with more tested techniques to prepare your mind for disasters and crises next week. Until then, you can work on controlling your emotions using the methods above. Stay safe!

Read Article No 1 About Mind Preparedness
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How To Create A Safe Room In Your Home – Part Two

How To Create A Safe Room In Your Home

In part 1 we talked about the first steps in building your own safe room. Today I’m going to give you some more advice on the topic of creating an unbreakable safe haven in your own home.

Power

The key principle here is that power needs to be 100% self-contained – so that if for example the power was down or deliberately cut (in a home invasion scenario), you would still have power in your inner sanctum.

An optimal system would be a battery bank with an inverter. That way, no matter what happens to the power outside, you have an uninterruptible power supply inside. These systems range from the cheap to the expensive and note that electrical hardwiring is best performed by someone qualified – for obvious safety and legal reasons.

Inverters come in two basic types – pure sine wave and modified sine wave. Pure sine wave (such as this Xantrex deliver better power quality than modified sine wave; and if you are running computers or other electronic equipment this is regarded as important for the safety of your equipment. Pure sine wave inverters are more expensive but a worthy investment. Note that there are numerous “cheapie” inverters out there that promise big power but don’t deliver. The Amazon reviews are very valuable in this regard – however note also, numerous appliances have a ‘current spike’ when switched on and a weaker inverter may not be able to cope. One sometimes sees reviews from someone stating “this inverter didn’t deliver” when in fact their wiring was too weak to handle the current draw. It’s better to go for a beefier inverter – however note that the cabling from battery to inverter should be substantial. The thicker the better, honestly – and this type of installation should be performed by someone who understands the formulas for calculating cable thickness and voltage drop in DC systems.

If your room has a window or other ventilation system you could potentially use a generator for power. If it doesn’t have a window or any type of ventilation, a generator could be a real danger to you because of the fumes – which can kill in an enclosed space. Not greatly advised.

You can also use battery-powered or hand-cranked lights and phones. This is the quickest and most affordable solution. Given the fact that you won’t spend a lifetime in the safe room, you shouldn’t need anything sophisticated. Just a rudimentary back-up power source to get you through the danger.

Plumbing

You have multiple options here, depending on how much you want to spend. You can settle for a portable toilet or you can choose separate plumbing and a septic tank. That means you’ll need a lot of water supplies in the room. One person needs roughly 1 gallon per day.

Supplies

First of all you need non-perishable food and safe water supplies. Don’t forget to rotate!

Secondly, you should get a first-aid case with basic medication, depending on your family’s needs.

Last, but not least, you need flashlights and extra batteries.

These are the basic items you should always keep in your safe room. But you can also get for example:

·         Warm and light clothes
·         Basic sanitation supplies
·         A radio – to stay informed on what happens outside
·         Blanket
·         Identification and other important documents
·         Duct tape
·         An extra pair of glasses – if you wear any
·         Cash and credit cards
·         Potassium-iodine tablets – in case of radiation sickness

You will likely wish to have some means of self-defense on hand but note that the general idea of a safe room is to keep you safe in an impenetrable space until help arrives. You aren’t going to want to open the door and the idea is to stay put.

In movies, safe rooms can be quite elaborate. In reality, a safe room serves only one purpose: to protect you from different types of dangers. You’re not supposed to spend a lot of time there, but rather have a small, hidden place to hide until it’s safe to go out again.

Remember, you only have to cover the essentials: food, health and protection.

Good luck in building your own safe room. We’ll talk soon about other important survival issues you have to know.

By MFSP

Read Part 1 of the Article About Creating a Safe Room

For more in-depth knowledge on protecting your home, check out Bulletproof Home

How to Create A Safe Room in Your Home

How to Create a Safe Room in Your Home

About a year ago, I started considering building a safe room (aka a “panic room”) for my family. I’d been interested in the subject for a couple of years and I became almost obsessed about the most space efficient safe room.

Took me a while to find all the information I needed (builders don’t want to reveal this kind of things, as their clients claim as much discretion about these secret safe havens as possible).

So finally, when I had everything I needed to start working on the safe room, I had to pick a room of the house for the transformation.

That’s right. You don’t need to build a new room from scratch in the middle of the house. You can just turn one of your already existing rooms: your bedroom, your living, even your bathroom (actually, this is one of the best ideas, since you’ve got running water and a toilet there).

Now, before I go further, let me just crash three myths about building a safe room in your home:

NO, you will not have to “sacrifice” a room. You can keep living there like nothing has changed.

NO, it will not look ugly. You can make many “invisible” tweaks or additions.

NO, you will not have to invest a ton of money and time in your safe room. In fact, it only takes a weekend or so to make the tweaks and load it with supplies.

So, choose a room you’d like to turn into a rock-solid safe haven and get down to business!

Here’s some of the things I’ve learned while working on my safe room (or while researching) that I believe would help you a lot:

1. Structure

If possible, choose a windowless room (or even a solid step-in closet). If you decided to transform your bedroom or living room, then you need to get shatterproof glass to replace the old windows.

Make sure your walls don’t have any major cracks or holes. Also, you can cover your walls with all-sponge upholstery to make it sound proof. This way, attackers won’t hear you talkin with your family or on the phone. And you won’t hear any verbal aggression from their part.

Replace your old door with an outdoor type of door (metal, preferably). They’re much more resistant and you can put multiple locks on. Which brings me to…

2. Security

First of all, you need an alarm system to let you know your house has been broken into. I know how expensive these things get, but how about a perfectly functional rudimentary system: put squealers on your doors and windows (they sound an alarm when someone breaks in). You can find them at Wal-Mart for about $25 (for your entire home).

Getting back to the safe room, you’ll want to put on more than one lock. The main one should be a keyless Grade 1 deadbolt lock. It’s practically unbreakable. Don’t forget to teach your kids or grandkids how it works, so they don’t lock themselves or someone else inside by accident.

Next on the list: security cameras. You can find entire 4-camera + split screen surveillance for $150 at SAMS Club. Look for the best offer and get a basic video surveillance system.

3. Communication

Permanently keep a phone in the safe room. If you’ve got weak or no signal at all, get a telephone line installed. You’ll need a way to communicate with the police or with your loved ones, so don’t miss this step.

Next week, we’ll talk all about power, plumbing, supplies and weapons in a safe room. Until then, stay safe!

By My Family Survival Plan

Read The Second Article About Creating a Safe Room

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