Posts tagged: fresh vegetables

15 Essential Crops To Have In Your Survival Garden

15 Essential Crops To Have In Your Survival Garden

In a survival scenario, the keyword is self-reliance. The weekly trips to the local food markets or stores will cease to become an option. And even if available, the prices will most likely sky-rocket so that it just won’t be convenient anymore. What you need to do is consider the possibility to set up your very own garden, which will sustain and provide for you and your entire family. It’s a rather complex task, but it’s nowhere near impossible. And once you’ll get the hang of it, it will become rather relaxing and enjoyable.

It’s something that can ultimately be achieved by the average Joe, with enough practice, resources, and dedication. You don’t have to be a professional farmer, you’ll just have to educate yourself a little on the matter. Be aware of the sustenance and nutrients each product has to offer, calculate how much land you’ll need for the endeavor and set your budget. Your best weapon (if you decide to pick up the shovel) is information: educate yourself on season crops, micro-farming, insect repellants, seed collections and storage and on the nutritional value of various crops.

And arm yourself with patience, because this type of activity requires a lot of practice if you’re starting from scratch. But you’ll get better at it with time, and at some point, you’ll be become self-sufficient, even though if you originally started gardening as a hobby. When it comes to choosing the right seeds, I strongly recommend getting non-GMO or heirloom variety seeds. These seeds will continue to reproduce, unlike the hybrid varieties that stop reproducing after the first season. Let’s have a look at different types of seeds that are suited for your very own survival garden.

Corn – it’s a warm-weather crop, very intolerant to low temperatures, so you should plant it only after the last frost. It usually produces two ears per stack and it’s loaded with calcium, iron, and protein. It’s easy to pick and to store.

Wheat – possibly the most common crop in the world, because of its large content of nutrients like copper, iron zinc and potassium. Spring wheat is planted in early spring and it’s the most common variety in the world. Winter wheat can be planted anytime from late September to mid-October.

Potatoes – they’re high in protein, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and potassium. It’s best if you plant your potatoes 4 – 6 weeks before the last frost. An average plant will hold somewhere in the lines of 4 -6 potatoes per sprout. When storing them, just know to keep them in a very cool and dark place, away from fruit.

Peas – it’s one of the most (if not THE) easiest plants to grow, because most varieties are not pretentious and grow very fast. Peas are rich in fiber, protein, potassium, vitamin A, Vitamin B6 and more. The best varieties to consider are the snap, the shelling and the sugar and snow pod. They will do just fine even during a harsh winter, as they’re resistant to frost.10 Foods You Can Store For 100 Years

Spinach – considered the original super-food, it’s a great source of nutrients such as vitamin A, vitamin C, folic acid, iron, and thiamin. It’s easy to grow, and most species grow best during winter. There are a few though that stray from the rule, so inform yourself before purchase.

Tomatoes – once again, we’re dealing with one of the easiest plants to plant and grow. It’s very nutritious as it’s abundant in vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin E, potassium, thiamine, and niacin. To make sure you get plenty of them throughout the year, just plant the first batch in late spring and the second one in late summer.

Beans – they come in many varieties, such as kidney beans, pole beans, bush beans etc. They are rich in fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, and Calcium. Pole beans require steak firmly planted in the ground, on which the plant can grapple and grow. Their grow cycle is shorter than that of the bush beans and the yield production is better as well. It’s easy to grow and staggering the plant will give continuous yields.

Carrots – there are very easy to grow and prefer cooler weather. So the best time for planting would be during fall, winter or early spring. They’re rich in vitamin A and beta-carotene, which is excellent anti-oxidant which does wander for your eyesight, skin or hair.

Garlic and Onions – they’re a very rich source vitamin B6, vitamin C, potassium, dietary fiber and folic acid (folate). They’re best planted in mid or late October and can be pulled early in case you’re eager to have green onions or garlic.

Cucumbers – they come in all shapes and sizes, with many varieties to choose from. You can pick whatever you like, from large to small ones (which are excellent for pickling). They are very nutritious, as they are loaded with vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium. They are a crop for warm weather and if you pick them regularly, you’ll get increased production.

Lettuce – not only will it be easy to plant and grow, but is also one of the earliest harvests you’ll get. It’s best if you plant it somewhere at 6 – 8 before the first frost date for optimum results. It grows quickly and you can pick it partially simply by choosing a few leaves at a time. The nutritional content differs in case of variety, but mostly all contain proteins, vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin C, calcium, potassium, folic acid, and iron.

Eggplants – it’s one of the most versatile vegetables when it comes to cooking, as it offers a lot of possibilities. It’s a warm weather plant and doesn’t do well during winter. So you should wait after the last frost is over in order to plant it. It’s high in fiber, vitamin B1, vitamin B6, and anti-oxidants.

Broccoli – it’s a plant that grows rather easily. It’s usually planted mid to late summer and by the time fall is upon us, you’ll have your first broccoli harvest. It has, however, the tendency to give yields even after the first harvest. It can withstand mild frost, but won’t survive a harsher climate. A far as nutrients go, it’s most commonly packed with vitamin A, vitamin K, and protein.

Cauliflower – it’s a cool season vegetable, resistant to low temperatures. It’s quite fast to grow and gives extremely rich yields. It’s very nutritious and can be very versatile when it comes to cooking. It’s packed with vitamin C, vitamin K, and dietary fibers.

Turnips – the seeds are best sown in late may, but if you get caught in doing anything else and forget, early summer will do just fine. They’re easy to manage, as they’re very resilient to plant diseases. It’s very versatile too, as you can eat the whole plant, green and root alike. They contain calcium, vitamin B6, vitamin C, and iron.

This list is a must for your very own garden, the plants that no survival enthusiast should go without during a crisis. Remember what I said before: take your time and practice, because it’s unlikely you’ll be successful right away. But once you get the hang of it, you and those close to you won’t go hungry a day in case SHTF. So get going, get your hands dirty and you’ll pick the fruit of your labor in no time… literally!

By My Family Survival Plan

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15 Essential Crops To Have In Your Survival Garden
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Emergency Food Recipe Of The Week #10: Tomato Pesto Bean And Shrimp Salad

Tomato Pesto Bean and Shrimp Saladphoto source: busycooks.about.com

This is it. The moment I’ve feared ever since discovering the emergency food recipes on busycooks.about.com. This is the last recipe left untested by me, so I thought it’s time I’d give it shot.

It’s a tomato pesto bean and shrimp salad. I’m not crazy about pesto, especially tomato pesto, but I’ve got to admit… I actually liked this salad. And so did our friends’ kids, and they are very picky when it comes to food.

So this is the proof that you can make great meals with emergency food that even your kids or grandkids will eat. And very healthy, too.

You may not know this, but shrimps have no less than 10 health benefits, according to HealthMad. Here they are:

#1: It helps fight cancer

“Every 85 g (8oz) of steamed shrimps can provide the body with 48% of the DV of selenium. Lack of selenium in the body has been linked to the incidence of many types of cancer, including prostate.”

#2: It keeps skin, hair and nails healthy and beautiful

“The most expensive shampoo and lotion will be useless to hair and skin without the adequate supply of protein in the body. Protein is a vital part of every living tissue and shrimps are excellent sources of this mineral.”

#3: It prevents anemia

Shrimps are rich in vitamin B12, a nutrient which supports the production of red blood cells and help prevent pernicious anemia.”

#4: It gives you energy

“Fatigue and weakness may indicate low levels of iron in the body. Iron is an essential nutrient needed for energy and vitality and shrimps are rich with this mineral.”

#5: It keeps your bones strong

“These crustaceans are loaded with phosphorus. Calcium and phosphorus are the two chief nutrients which work closely together to build strong bones and teeth.”

#6: It helps process fats

“Niacin (vitamin B3) helps process fats, carbohydrates and protein and turns it into energy. Shrimps can provide a good amount of this essential vitamin.”

#7: It helps fight depression

“Just like fish, shrimps can also supply omega-3 fatty acids. Study participants have shown that omega-3’s offer powerful protection against depression and may help improve mood to those who are already suffering from the disorder.”

#8: It improves prostate health

“Preliminary studies have shown that zinc slow down prostate cancer cell growth. Eating shrimps will add to the body’s needed daily value of this mineral which is only 10-15 mg.”

#9: It keeps thyroid healthy

“Shrimps can contribute to thyroid health through its supply of copper.”

#10: It helps stabilize blood sugar levels

“These scrumptious seafoods are also good sources of magnesium, which studies suggest can help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes”

Now let’s see what you need for this recipe:

• 1/2 cup dried tomato pesto mix

• 1/4 cup olive oil

• 1/4 cup tomato juice

• 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

• 2 tablespoons evaporated milk

• 1 (15-ounce) can butter beans

• 1 (15-ounce) can Great Northern Beans

• 3 (6-ounce) cans medium shrimp, drained

• 1 green bell pepper, chopped

• 1 red or yellow bell pepper, chopped

• 1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained, reserving juice

You’ll also need a large bowl, where you’ll throw in the pesto mix, olive oil, tomato juice reserved from the drained tomatoes and Parmesan cheese. Mix it well, then add evaporated milk and stir. Then let it stand for 5 minutes.

Next, you can add the remaining ingredients, using fresh vegetables (if you have any at hand. Last thing on the To do list: stir to coat.

Now you can enjoy this wonderful salad with your family. Hope you’ll like it.

By Anne Sunday