Posts tagged: dogs

The Best 5 Dog Breeds For Your Personal Protection

The Best 5 Dog Breeds For Your Personal Protection

Dogs have been domesticated for millennia now, and ever since they have earned (and rightfully so) the reputation of “man’s best friend”. A family dog will get very attached to its owner or owners. And thanks to its territorial nature, will do a great job of protecting the ones he holds dear and his territory (your house and possessions). Throughout the years, dog breeding has become more and more specialized, with different types of breeds particularly good for different types of tasks, like: protection, hunting, guides for the blind, companions etc. If treated well and loved, your dog will reward you being faithful, caring and protective in return.

Dogs bred for protection in most cases, can be your best line of defense: they can sense danger from afar (smelling the approaching strangers) and can alert you by barking. But if this fails and you find yourself or your family under attack, your dog won’t hesitate to retaliate against your attacker. You can always count on your dog’s loyalty when it comes to protecting its master, no matter his size or ability. Next I’m going show you  the best 5 dog breeds for personal protection, on which most experts agree upon.

The German Shepherd

According to most specialists, the German Shepherd is THE guard dog. This breed is rather new, as it was first bred in the 19th century, in Germany (hence the name). It was immediately exported to America, and during the World Wars it was used on the field by pretty much everybody thanks to their keen sense of smell, which made them prefect in land mine detection or enemy tracking. They’re the most common breed used by the police force today, due to their obedience, sense of smell and responsiveness. The German Shepherd is particularly intelligent; they’re very fast learners and very good listeners when they’re given a certain command. Their fur is rather thick, which makes them tolerant to drastic climate change: they are very resistant to cold weather but they will easily shed in warm climate, in order to adapt. They are very aware of their surroundings and do an excellent job in protecting their homes and owners. Their size is considerable, capable of overpowering anybody. but despite their aggressive look, they are very loving by nature, especially with children. They are most effective if properly trained. It’s necessary the dog will have his very own place or quarters to sleep, so that he can understand his role in the family. As mentioned before, they are fast learners and if loved and cared for, you’ll need no better protection for you and your entire family.

The Doberman Pinscher

This breed originated in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. They’ve been brought to the US after the end of World War II and used mostly in military and police situations. Although many races were thrown into the mix, they carried greyhound traits quite strongly. Their careful breeding gave them excellent traits for a guard dog, like athleticism, strength and obedience. If trained properly, the Doberman will be very loyal to its master and very obedient to his every command. It’s not what you would call a loving dog, but it’s very aware and protective of its family (at the same time weary of people he doesn’t know) and quick to react if need be. They don’t require much grooming and attention, since their hair is short: regular feeding and exercising will suffice. The breed is rather disease-free; regular vet-checks and ear and tail clippings will avoid complications. They are not easily trained, and need to be dominated from an early age to understand authority. Also its best you they are brought up in a home full of children rather than brought in at an older age.

The Great Dane

The Great Dane (aka. the German Mastiff) has a long lineage that dates to about 3000 B.C. It was originally bred for hunting and protecting the household, but later one they were also put to military purposes, thanks to their innate sense of smell, which makes them excellent trackers. Although this breed is very big and intimidating, they are very gentle in nature, excellent around children or even other dog breeds. Despite their size, they are very well proportioned and have a great sense of balance. In other words, they are usually very size-aware and won’t run around the house, laying everything to waste in their path. It’s better as a guard dog than a protection dog, because of its timid nature. It might run away from a confrontation if scared, but their bark is extremely powerful and intimidating. In most cases it’s enough to keep evil doers at bay. You can’t just bring a Great Dane into your house without proper training. He will need constant supervision until he gets familiarized with the house, so they can learn what’s off limits and what’s not. Their size requires a fair amount of exercise, but overdoing it may cause health-related problems. Just limit you Great Dane to just daily walks and he should live a long a healthy life.

The Saint Bernard

If the name doesn’t ring a bell, just remember the movie about a big dog name Beethoven and there you have it. The breed is original from Northern Europe, where they were used on harsh climate conditions to roam and track travelers or lost civilians, mostly in snowy mountain areas. They could be easily followed through safe passage by almost everybody, thanks to their friendly nature. With big size, comes a big heart. Despite the fact that they can grow to about 180 pounds, they are very sociable and lovable, and they do extremely well in a large family setting. Just like the Great Dane, the Saint Bernard is more of a barker than a fighter, but unlike the Dane they aren’t at all aware of their size. So leaving small children unattended in their presence is unadvised, as they could easily sit or trample unknowingly over toddlers. As for training, they aren’t very responsive until they reach adulthood. They’ll eat more than any other breed of dog, require daily exercise and need fur brushing a few times a week. They’re life span is no longer than 10 years due to their massive size, but if you’re looking for a dog that more menacing by look than by nature, than look no further.

The Rottweiler

They go as far back as Antiquity does, when they were used as both guard and attack dogs in the legions of the Roman Empire. In more modern times, they did very well as police dogs or household guard dogs, thanks to their aggressive nature and intelligence. It’s a dog that you absolutely cannot bring into your home without professional training. He can be very aggressive and if not trained properly, a Rottweiler can pose a threat even to children.

They are known to be some of the smartest dogs on the planet, which makes them very responsive to training and obedient.

And after the training session is over the dog is used to its surroundings, you’ll see that he can be extremely loving and friendly towards the whole family. As far as the Rottweiler’s physical condition goes, you’ll have no problems.

They have maybe the best health history out of all domesticated dog breeds, and if fed and exercised regularly they live an average of 10 years.

There are many breeds of dogs to choose from. And when you chose yours, make sure you consult a specialist on the kind of dog would suit you most. A guard dog may be your best ally in a hostile or even SHTF situation, as they can guard and defend alike. However, always keep in mind that a dog is not a tool, nor a weapon. It’s a pet and a companion most of all, which requires time and effort to hold. But if you love and respect your dog, be sure that he’ll have no second thought about putting his life on the line for yours.

By My Family Survival Plan

Survival Medicine 101 Part 4: CPR

Survival Medicine 101 Part 4 - CPR

image: randomfunnypicture.com

Last time I promised you I’d show you how to perform CPR correctly, in case you’ll ever need to bring someone back to life (or keep someone alive). I honestly hope you’ll never have to do this, but it’s good to know these things… just in case.

Now, I clearly remember taking a CPR course in high school, but I wanted to check all the steps again… and what I found was a bit more complex than what I learned. But it’s not that difficult, so don’t freak out thinking I’m going to get you through med school in just a few minutes, ok?

There will be videos, too, taken right from the University of Washington website, so you’ll see exactly how to perform every step of the way.

CPR for Adults

Step #1: CALL

Check the victim for unresponsiveness(shake or shout at the victim). If the person is not responsive and not breathing or not breathing normally, call 911 and return to the victim. In most locations the emergency dispatcher can assist you with CPR instructions.

Don’t forget to keep calm. Do as told and tell the dispatcher about any change in the victim’s state.

Step #2: PUMP

If the victim is still not responding normally to stimuli or if he still can’t breathe right, begin chest compressions. Push down in the center of the chest 2 inches 30 times. Pump hard and fast at the rate of at least 100/minute, faster than once per second.

Step #3: BLOW

Tilt the head back and lift the chin. Pinch nose and cover the mouth with yours and blow until you see the chest rise. Give 2 breaths. Each breath should take 1 second.

CONTINUE WITH 30 PUMPS AND 2 BREATHS UNTIL HELP ARRIVES

NOTE: This ratio is the same for one-person & two-person CPR. In two-person CPR the person pumping the chest stops while the other gives mouth-to-mouth breathing.

And here’s the video:

Now lets’ move on to…

CPR for Children

It’s similar to CPR for adults. If you are alone with the victim, give 2 minutes of CPR and then call 911.

Step #1: PUMP

Use the heel of one or two hands for chest compression. Press the sternum about one-third the depth of the chest (about 2 inches) at the rate of least 100/minute.

Step #2: BLOW

Tilt the head back and listen for breathing. If not breathing normally, pinch nose and cover the mouth with yours and blow until you see the chest rise. Give 2 breaths. Each breath should take 1 second.

CONTINUE WITH 30 PUMPS AND 2 BREATHS UNTIL HELP ARRIVES

And the video:

Now here’s a more difficult type of CPR:

CPR for Infants

You’ve got to be extremely careful not to break any bones or harm the baby in any way. If you are alone with the baby, perform 2 minutes of CPR and then call 911.

Step #1: Shout and Tap

Shout and gently tap the child on the shoulder. If there is no response and not breathing or not breathing normally, position the infant on his or her back and begin CPR.

Step #2: Give 30 Compressions

Give 30 gentle chest compressions at the rate of at least 100 per minute. Use two or three fingers in the center of the chest just below the nipples. Press down approximately one-third the depth of the chest (about 1 and a half inches).

Step #3: Open The Airway

Open the airway using a head tilt lifting of chin. Do not tilt the head too far back.

Step #4: Give 2 Gentle Breaths

If the baby is not breathing or not breathing normally, cover the baby’s mouth and nose with your mouth and give 2 gentle breaths. Each breath should be 1 second long. You should see the baby’s chest rise with each breath.

You can see exactly how it’s done here:

And there’s one more type of CPR:

CPR for Cats & Dogs

That’s right. If you’ve got pets and they’re fighting to stay alive, then you should know how you can help them. Here’s what you should do:

Step #1: Remove any obstruction

Open animals mouth and make sure the air passage is clear. If not remove the object obstructing the air passage.

Step #2: Extend the head and give several artificial respirations:

  • A. For large dogs: close the animal’s jaw tightly and breathe into the nose. The animal’s chest should rise. Give 2 breaths.
  • B. For small dogs and cats you may be able to cover the nose and mouth with your mouth as you breathe. The animal’s chest should rise. Give 2 breaths.

Step #3: PUMP

  • A. For large dogs you may be able to position the dogs on its back and compress the chest just like for humans.
  • B. For small dogs and cats as well as large dogs with funnel chests, you may need to lie the animal on its side and compress the side of the rib cage. Alternatively you can position the animal on its back and press on both sides of the rib cage.
  • C. The rate of chest compressionsvaries with the size of the animal
  • Dogs over 60 lbs: 60 compressions per minute
  • Animals 11 to 60 lbs: 80-100 compressions per minute
  • Animals 10 lbs or less: 120 compressions per minute

Step #4: Alternate breaths with compressions

The ratio of compressions to breaths should be approximately the same as for humans – 30:2 Continue doing this until the animal responds or begins to breathe on its own.

There’s no video here, unfortunately. They probably didn’t have a dog-shaped dummy, but it’s great they thought about pets, too.

Again, I truly hope you’ll never need this info. But if you ever do, try to replicate the moves you see in the videos.

And don’t forget the essentials: CALL 911, PUMP the chest and BLOW air into lungs.

For more articles on survival topics, go to: www.myfamilysurvivalplan.com.

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