Build a Bug Out Kindle: A Digital Survival Library at Your Fingertips

Build a Bug Out Kindle - A Digital Survival Library at Your Fingertips

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Creek Stewart, Senior Instructor at the Willow Haven Outdoor School for Survival, Preparedness & Bushcraft.

A “bug out situation” is the phrase used to describe a survival scenario which makes staying at home more dangerous than leaving. Disasters — natural and manmade — happen to regular people on a regular basis, driving them from their homes in search of a safer destination. Oftentimes, evacuees are forced to survive with their wits and the survival supplies they can carry on their back. You may have read my article here — How to Make a Bug Out Bag — or my book which that article inspired titled Build the Perfect Bug Out Bag. If so, you already have a head-start in building your own personal 72-hour disaster kit to help you and your family survive a potential bug out evacuation. This article is written with that same conviction — to help further prepare you for when the unthinkable knocks at your front door.

Here’s the good news: survival knowledge weighs nothing.

This is true for those who practice and study survival and preparedness skills on a regular basis. But for those who don’t, access to that survival knowledge only has to weigh about 1 pound – the weight of an Amazon Kindle. I’m not at all suggesting that the practice and study of survival skills should or can be replaced by ebooks. However, an entire survival library of information at your fingertips just may be the one survival tool in your Bug Out Bag that saves your life.

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Until recent years, carrying millions of pages of survival information in your Bug Out Bag was not only impractical, it was impossible. Digital readers such as the Amazon Kindle have been a game changer in how we buy, store, organize, and read books. I’ve traditionally been very anti-digital when it comes to packing electronics in my Bug Out Bag. Their fragility and short battery life have always fallen short of the demanding requirements that a bug out situation presents. The recent advent of lightweight portable power and waterproof/shock-resistant cases (both discussed later) now makes this bug out survival resource very durable and practical, no matter what Mother Nature throws your way.

Building Your Survival Library

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No digital reader will ever replace the feeling of sitting back in my favorite chair and leafing through the tattered pages of my very early Boy Scout Handbook that I picked up at a flea market for fifteen cents when I was a kid. I’ve dissected that manual for more than 30 years and it never gets old. I’ll hate to leave it and many of my other favorite hard copy books behind when I bug out. But, I have most of them on my Kindle just in case.

When it comes to stocking your Kindle or tablet with survival related information, I definitely have some recommendations. This is far from an exhaustive list, but it is a great start for anyone interested in building a good foundation on a Bug Out Kindle. I’ve divided these suggestions into 6 main categories: Survival Skills, Shelter, Water, Fire, Food, First Aid, and Documents.

Survival Skills

These are titles that discuss a variety of well-rounded survival skills. Many of them are complete survival manuals, and therefore touch on all 6 categories mentioned above.

How to Stay Alive in the Woods: A Complete Guide to Food, Shelter and Self-Preservation Anywhere by Bradford Angier

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This is a classic wilderness survival book originally written in the 50s. It’s packed full of practical wilderness survival skills revolving around shelter, water, fire, and food. Bradford wrote several other outdoor skills books worth considering as well.

Wilderness Survival by Gregory J. Davenport

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Greg is an Air Force SERE (Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape) specialist and this is one of the best books written on the subject. His discussion and illustrations of protection, sustenance, signaling, travel, and health is as good as it gets.

US ARMY Survival Manual FM 21-76

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This is a very straightforward and to-the-point survival manual with field-tested survival techniques bought and paid for by hard-earned US tax dollars. This manual is packed full of great survival know-how and should be in every survival library.

Back to Basics by Abigail Gehring

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This book is packed full of practical pioneer-type homesteading skills such as growing food, canning, keeping chickens, generating energy, and herbal medicine. This is a great read for anyone interested in the nuts and bolts of living like our grandparents did at the turn of the century.

Basic Safe Travel and Boreal Handbook by Mors Kochanski

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One of the best books written about surviving in the north woods and Canada. Mors is one of the most articulate and intelligent survival authors I have ever read. He has several smaller ebooks available (some mentioned later) that are excellent reads and are very inexpensive. I own pretty much all of them. Some of my favorites are: Basic Wilderness Survival in Cold Lacking Snow, Fire Skills of the Northern Forest, The Lean-To and It’s Variants, A Survival Kit Shelter, and Top Seven Knots.

Outdoor Survival Skills by Larry Dean Olsen

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Larry is truly a master of the primitive arts and is an icon in the world of primitive survival skills. His use and skill with natural materials such as leather, bone, rock, and wood are unparalleled. Whether making a bow and arrow or tanning hides, this guy teaches a huge variety of primitive skills.

US Air Force Pocket Survival Manual

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This is my favorite of the government survival manuals. I really like the illustrations and it seems to contain a bigger variety of skills. There is also a huge section on the psychological effects of survival and evasion. Most survival guides lack in these categories.

Build the Perfect Bug Out Bag: Your 72-hour Disaster Survival Kit by Yours Truly – Creek Stewart

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If you haven’t yet begun the process of building a Bug Out Bag, this book is a great start. It’s more of a manual to help get it done than it is a survival skills book, but I do list tons of survival tips and tricks for getting the biggest bang for your buck when building a Bug Out Bag.

Shelter

Many of the books in the Survival Skills category above cover shelter in one way, shape, or form, but the books below discuss this topic almost exclusively.

The Lean-To and It’s Variants Used in Survival and Bush Bough Beds by Mors Kochanski

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One of the best cold weather shelter reads available. I love Mors’ intellectual approach to survival and shelter building.

The Super Shelter by Mors Kochanski

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Mors pretty much invented the “super shelter” design which uses plastic sheeting and mylar blankets to create an amazing cold weather survival shelter.

Shelters, Shacks, and Shanties by D.C. Beard

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From lean-tos to log cabins, mountain man shelter ideas abound in this book. This is one that will make you want to go out, build a fort in the woods, and sleep there.

Water

Titles in this category deal almost exclusively with finding, collecting, filtering, and purifying wild water.

Harvesting H2O by Nicholas Hyde

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An excellent discussion about the collection, treatment, and storage of water while living off the grid.

Water Purification by Will Jameson

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An incredibly thorough discussion about water purification, storage, and acquisition.

Water 4 Survival by Paul Andrulis

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Another helpful read about finding water, determining whether it’s safe to drink, and teaching how to make it safe for consumption.

Fire

I’ve only listed one title in this category, as many of the titles in the Survival Skills category discuss fire in great detail and are excellent fire resources.

Fire Skills: 50 Methods for Starting Fires Without Matches by David Aman

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This is a great primer in exploring many different methods of making fire. It lists 50 different fire-starting methods, some of which are very inventive and fun. Reading this book will not make you a fire master; only practicing fire starting will do this, but you can use this book to get different ideas to challenge your skills and broaden your knowledge base.

Food

Whether foraging for wild foods or stockpiling your own, these titles deal exclusively with sustenance.

21 Native Wild Edible Plants by Mors Kochanski

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This inexpensive ebook is worth the money simply to read Mors’ discussion on the plants listed. The line drawings aren’t much for reference so you’ll need a better photo guide for that, but it’s the words that are important in this book. I like that this little guide just covers a few plants because that fits into my personal 80/20 wild edible plants rule which states: “FOCUS on the 20% of the wild edible plants you see 80% of the time. FORGET the rest!”

Wild Edibles by Sergei Boutenko

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Sergei is an enthusiastic author and wild edible plant fanatic. I really enjoy his approach to wild edibles. His photos are some the best I’ve seen and his discussions are easy to understand and straight to the point. He covers 60 plants in this book.

Food Storage for Self-Sufficiency and Survival by Angela Paskett

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Angela is a personal friend of mine and she practices what she preaches. I would consider this a definitive guide in learning and understanding best practices when it comes to long-term food storage. She covers everything from types of containers to methodology. If you’re looking to stockpile your survival pantry, this read is for you.

Backyard Foraging by Ellen Zachos

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This is a great wild edible plant book covering 65 plants you didn’t know you could eat. There is certainly some redundancy with other titles mentioned, but this book is a good stand alone resource for eating your backyard!

Build Your Own Underground Root Cellar by Phyllis Hobson

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An underground root cellar has been on my project list for several years and this is the book I purchased to help get the job done. It’s a great little read. This title is part of a series of very informative ebooks called Storey Country Wisdom Bulletins and there are many other titles that may pique your interest.

Urban Foraging by David Craft

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This title might be of interest to all of you city dwellers. I enjoyed the urban angle of searching for wild edibles in the city. There is literally food around every corner!

All New Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew

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I love this author’s approach to gardening. He is all about growing more in less space and it just makes sense. His methodical approach to planting in a square-foot design is impressive to say the least. My personal experiments from the skills taught in this book have proven successful beyond measure and I highly recommend this style of growing for any gardening enthusiast.

First Aid

The need for first aid supplies and services go through the roof during disaster and survival scenarios. These are also the first services to become overwhelmed and unavailable. The ability to provide for yourself and loved ones with basic first aid is critical. These books will help.

Where There Is No Doctor by David Werner

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Don’t expect to read this in one sitting – it’s LONG! It covers medical advice for everything from toothaches to survival childbirth. I would consider this manual an indispensable guide in any survival library. The premise of the book is that medical knowledge should not be a guarded secret by a select few, but should be freely shared by everyone, and that ordinary people who are provided with clear, simple information can prevent and treat most common health problems in their own homes.

Outward Bound Wilderness First-Aid Handbook by Jeffrey Isaac

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I like the wilderness-specific angle of this title. If it can happen in the outdoors then it’s probably covered in this book. From altitude illness to constipation, this is a no-nonsense guide to address first aid issues in the wilderness. Outward Bound is a very reputable organization and this handbook has become a classic resource for adventurers all over the world.

The Survival Medicine Handbook by Joseph and Amy Alton

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I especially like this title because it’s written by preparedness-minded people for preparedness-minded people. They write from the perspective of asking, “What if access to modern medical facilities no longer exists?” They do not end each scenario or sentence with, “Go to the hospital.” I like that. This is an A-Z medical guide for true survival scenarios written in plain English.

Documents

One cool thing about the kindle (at least the newer models) is that you can upload PDFs into an accessible documents area for easy reference. The sky is the limit when it comes to this option. From maps and GPS coordinates to addresses and telephone numbers, this puts literally any kind of information that you wish at your fingertips in the middle of a bug out scenario. I’ve loaded tons of medical documents such as antibiotic doses and measurements to this folder. I also include chemical water purification ratios and PDF manuals for some of my electronics, such as my handheld HAM radio.

This feature, which some e-readers lack, gives you the option of loading personal documents such as insurance paperwork, pet shot records, marriage licenses, bank information, and the like for easy reference. I prefer to keep my personal documents on a secure, password-protected thumb drive, but the Kindle is a great option for less sensitive information.

One other category worth mentioning within this heading is games. I know this sounds crazy initially, but a few games can be a huge asset when bugging out with young children. Anything to distract their minds from the craziness is a good thing. An idle mind leads down troubled paths. Many simple games can be downloaded free of charge.

Protection and Power

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Protecting and powering your Bug Out Kindle are two absolute requirements. If both of these options were not possible, a Kindle would not be included in my Bug Out Bag. Options abound when it comes to both.

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Military-grade cases and covers are readily available on-line that are shock-resistant and waterproof – two absolute bug out necessities. A durable waterproof sleeve or map case will suffice at a bare minimum.

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Solar power and manual crank USB chargers are readily available as well. Most hand crank emergency radios now have a USB charger built in, which will power the Kindle. Stand alone Pocket Sockets are also available. I prefer the hand crank power options for recharging, but I have several friends who swear by solar. Ultimately, it’s a personal choice.

Conclusion

Packing a sizable survival library along with hand-picked PDFs which catalog a plethora of facts and references in your Bug Out Bag just makes survival sense. Affordable portable power and protective cases make a Bug Out Kindle a very feasible and practical survival tool that can handle the worst of scenarios. The built-in camera and video features allow the capture of important information for future reference as well.

Albert Einstein once said, “Information is not knowledge.” This is true. However, access to information about a subject which you’re not knowledgeable can be a huge survival advantage. In survival, I’ll take every competitive advantage I can get, including a Bug Out Kindle.

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

Creek.

11 Ways A Condom Can Save Your Life In A Survival Situation

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I’ve just come out of hibernation from writing another survival book (details to come soon).  I really need a fun ‘creative’ and not too serious survival project.  I figure since my survival tampon post went over so well (did you know I was featured on the OFFICIAL TAMPAX FACEBOOK PAGE – my Mom was so proud!) I would keep this project in the same spirit.  Hope you enjoy.

Including CONDOMS in survival kits is not a new idea.  People have been packing them in mini survival kits for as long as I can remember – using them primarily as an expandable WATER CONTAINER.  Don’t worry, I’ll get into details later.  While a little taboo, I’ll ask that you set aside any preconceived notions you might have about condoms.  In this post, I’ll argue that as far as  multi-functional survival uses are concerned, the condom offers an incredible BANG for your buck.  Sorry – I couldn’t resist.

I’ll break down the many uses within each CORE SURVIVAL CATEGORY.

WATER

As I’ve mentioned, including condoms in survival kits is not a new idea.  They make amazing compact water containers that can hold as much as 2 liters of water if handled properly.  They are, after all, designed to be water tight.  The elasticity of latex condoms is SHOCKING.

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These little suckers will stretch to sizes that will surprise you.  Check out how big this one got?

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However, while it excels in elasticity, it lacks in durability.  The thin latex walls are very susceptible to sharp objects and puncture.  Especially when filled with water, the slightest prick (even from a blade of grass) will split it open almost instantly.  Then, you’ve lost your water AND your container.  No fear – there is a strategy for carrying water in a condom.  The easiest I’ve found it to take off your sock and fill the condom inside of your sock.  Not only does the sock provide stability but it also provides protection.  It still needs to be coddled like a little baby but it’s not AS delicate.  Other options are to wrap it in a t-shirt and even fill it inside a backpack or helmet.  It helps to stretch the condom a little bit first – kind of like you do when getting ready to blow up a balloon. Condom balloon animals anyone?

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A Condom is easier to fill when water is falling into it versus just sweeping it through the water.  In nature, if you can find a little water fall or fast moving water it will make your life a lot easier.  Tie the mouth of the condom off around a stick about the diameter of your thumb.  This way, you can fairly easily untie it.  Just knotting it off with no stick makes it very difficult to open back up again.  You may need to use it over and over again so don’t rush it.

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We sell NON-LUBRICATED Survival Kit Condoms in the Willow Haven E-Store.  Here’s the link to order: http://willowhavenoutdoor.com/store/products/non-lubricated-survival-kit-condoms/

Just because you’ve collected and contained water doesn’t mean it’s OK to drink.  Once your condom is full, you must now consider purification options.  Boiling is not an option unless you have a metal container.  But, maybe you have a metal container and you’re just using the the condom to transport MORE water from point A to point B.  If so, great.  If not, you can purify the water chemically with Iodine, Bleach (Chlorine) or store bought water purification tablets.  Learn how to purify water with bleach in this POST I WROTE HERE. If you are packing condoms in a small survival kit, be sure to include a handful of purification tablets for a complete water purification system.  Need some great water purification tablets?  I sell some HERE for only $7.98.  Stocking stuffer anyone?  I can see it now, a box of condoms and some water purification tabs sticking out of a Christmas stocking.  There’s something just not right about that picture.

stocking

FIRE

The most obvious way to use a condom to aid in survival fire is to protect DRY fire tinder.  Just because the weather is great NOW doesn’t mean it’s going to stay that way.  Finding dry fire tinder in wet and rainy conditions can be very difficult.  Protecting dry fire tinder during inclement weather is very easy – when you have a condom.  Simply stuff the condom with your best tinder and tuck it away for a rainy day.  No rocket science here.

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One condom  even protects this entire bracket fungus – which contains a load of excellent natural tinder.

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The condom ITSELF also makes excellent fire tinder.  With an open flame such as a match or cigarette lighter, a latex condom will ignite almost instantaneously and burn furiously for several minutes – allowing you plenty of time to build your fire.  Below is a quick video I shot to demonstrate how well a latex condom burns:

But what if you don’t have an ignition source?  Fire requires 3 elements: IGNITION SOURCE (HEAT), FUEL and OXYGEN.  If you don’t have matches or a ferro rod, then I guess you can fill the condom with water and use it as a magnifying glass on a sunny day like this guy did:

Anyone ever tried this?  It’s fall here in Indiana and the sun isn’t hot enough this time of year to make it work but you can guarantee next summer I’ll try it.  But, I’m not going to let NO SUN stop me from getting a fire by using a condom so I resorted to a more primitive method – the thumb loop hand drill.  The hand drill is probably the hardest of all primitive fire starting methods.  Without practice, it can be very difficult to get the right combination of pressure and spindle speed to generate enough heat to create an ember.  However, thumb loops really help facilitate this process.  Thumb loops allow the user to apply more pressure on the spindle and also spin their hands in pretty much one place.  Below is a video of how I used condom thumb loops to help generate a coal with a hand drill set.

I also used a handful of condoms as a engine for a traditional Bow Drill Fire Set.  Notice in the video below that the condom engine replaces the typical BOW in BOW Drill.  I call this  the CONDOM DRILL FIRE by FRICTION SET:

Any other ways you can think of to start a fire using a condom?

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FOOD

Seriously, how can a condom provide you with survival food?  In more ways than you might think actually…

I’m a huge fan of sling shots.  I’ve been working on a small game hunting post featuring sling shots for several months and this was the perfect opportunity to test out an idea I had – the Condom Small Game Hunter Sling Shot.  Sounds funny, right?  Condoms aren’t that much different from the latex bands that come stock with most small game hunting sling shots.  Remember, your ability to improvise is your most valuable survival skill!

I started my build with a natural tree fork.

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After a little detailing and carving I ended up with a nice little pocket sized Sling Shot Frame.

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Next, I used 3 condoms on each fork to provide the force necessary to kill small game.  I put the condoms inside each other with a little wad of cattail fuzz at the bottom and used duct tape to hold each condom band on the frame.  The wad of cattail fuzz prevents the condoms from pulling out of the duct tape.

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I decided rather than launch imperfect rocks with a leather pouch, I would use a loop of bank line as a anchor point to nock a hand-carved mini dart.  I wrapped the other end of the condoms around the loop of bank line and again duct taped it in place.

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Below is a maple branch I used to carve some of the mini dart projectiles.

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As you can see, some of the darts are tipped with a Honey Locust thorn using Pine Pitch.  It’s not necessary, but I’m really digging how deadly these darts look, aren’t you?  To see how I make an all natural Pine Pitch Glue, read THIS POST.

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Those are some sick looking little arrows aren’t they?  I know what you’re thinking.  Cool looking sling-shot, but there’s no way you can actually kill small game with it in a survival scenario.  Oh, ye of little faith.

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In the 1 minute video below, you can see the condom sling shot in action.

FIRST AID

Worse case scenario, a condom can be used as a crude rubber glove while dealing with any first aid related issues.  It will protect the wound from your nasty hands as well as protect you from the wound if you’re dealing with someone else.

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MISCELLANEOUS

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Protect Your Muzzle

I’ve heard 1st hand accounts from soldiers who’ve attended courses at Willow Haven that they used condoms to protect their rifles while serving in the Middle East.  They would cover the muzzle of their rifle to prevent sand/mud/water from getting inside – very simple and effective.

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Fishing Bobber

While there are many natural options for a fishing bobber, a make-shift condom bobber is pretty darn effective.  I’ve found that rather than just tying off an air bubble in the condom, it works a little better if you stuff in some cattail fluff (called ‘cattail down’) instead.  Cattail down is naturally buoyant and also water-resistant so it’s the perfect bobber filling.  Did you know that life-jackets used to be filled with cattail down before synthetic materials were invented?  You may need to know that if you ever want to construct a survival life-jacket!  The cattail down adds a little weight to prevent your bobber from just blowing around in the wind.

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Companionship

Anyone ever seen CAST AWAY with Tom Hanks?  Remember his little buddy WILSON?  I’ve got a survival companion too.  I just call him Lil’ Cody.  He debuted in the sling shot video above when I put a mini-arrow through his face.  He’ll keep you company when you are alone, starving and freezing in the woods while trying to make a Condom Sling Shot.

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I have to say, I did feel a little pressure to perform when he was watching me carve out the Condom Hand Drill set below. I always do better in front of an audience anyway.  I think there’s something to this “WILSON” idea.

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Ok, so what did I miss?  What other survival uses for a condom can YOU think of?  And, what’s NEXT?  What is another product we can brainstorm for survival functions?

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

By Creek Stewart – www.willowhavenoutdoor.com

6 Strategies to Lighten Your Bug Out Bag

6 Strategies to Lighten Your Bug Out Bag

Is it time for BOB to go on a diet???

One very popular question I get is about Bug Out Bag weight.  Unfortunately, it’s never that there is TOO MUCH space left over in the pack.  I’m always asked for ideas about how to reduce pack weight and eliminate unnecessary items.  Below are 6 tips I’ve come up with for cutting weight from your BOB.  Hopefully, one will work for you or at least help you brainstorm a creative solution.  I’ve found that when you’re really getting serious about cutting Bug Out Bag weight then you must go through your pack one item at a time.  You can’t just look at your pack from across the room and hope to come up with weight saving ideas.  This needs to be a methodical and strategic process that involves deliberate thought and consideration about every single piece of kit in your BOB.  This is a perfect process for a rainy Sunday afternoon.

TIP #1: Trim the Food Fat

By this, I mean cut out everything that has to do with food except for 6 high calorie energy bars (I pack CLIF bars).  The average human can survive for 3 weeks without food and still have no ill effects to the body.  In fact, I read one time that the record human fast was 1 year.  That makes eating less during a 72 hour Bug Out seem more than possible!  I’m not suggesting not to eat at all during a Bug Out, I’m simply suggesting to cut out all the food related items that you don’t need and only pack high calorie energy bars.  Things to remove include stoves, fuel canisters/tabs, pots, pans, silverware, spices – EVERYTHING related to cooking and eating food.  This stuff is bulky, heavy and at the end of the day, unnecessary for a 72-hour Bug Out.  DATREX Rations are another compact calorie dense food option.

TIP # 2: Sleep System

Let’s face it, sleeping bags are one of the bulkiest and heaviest items in our BOBs.  I’ve long experimented with ways to reduce weight and bulk in the sleeping department.  One solution I’ve discovered is to go with a lighter and smaller higher degree bag.  Some of the new 50 degree rated bags are only $30-$60 and pack down to about the size of a small melon.  This alone isn’t sufficient for cold weather Bug Outs.  A way to add about 20 degrees to a bag like this and drop it to a 30 degree bag is to combine it with a reflective emergency bivvy like the SOL Emergency Bivvy (combo seen above).  It’s certainly not as comfortable as a nice fluffy ZERO degree bag but it sure weighs a lot less and takes up a lot less space if you need to drop weight in your BOB.  You’ll probably notice some condensation in the bivvy but a couple shakes and a few minutes in open air and it dries out quick.

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TIP # 3: Every Ounce Counts

Take a lesson from ultra light weight backpackers who literally account for every ounce of weight in their pack and weigh it on a scale.  Their motto is “Every Ounce Counts” and if there’s a way to cut out an ounce they will find it.  Some strategies I’ve heard of are:

  • Trimming the edges from maps (I’m not kidding)
  • Cutting down the tooth brush handle
  • Using lighter weight ‘tooth powder’ instead of tooth paste
  • Trimming unnecessary pieces from packs such as removing the sternum strap if you don’t use it
  • Cutting tags out of cloths, sleeping bags and sacks
  • If your electronics use AA batteries then find replacements that don’t use batteries at all or that use lighter weight AAA instead
  • Use titanium where possible; pots, pans, mugs, bottles, stoves, utensils, tent stakes.  It’s expensive but it’s as light as it gets.
  • Put pills and medicines in zip-lock bags instead of prescription bottles
  • Drill holes in stuff.  Anything that you can drill a hole in without affecting function will cut weight.

Along these same lines, try to stay true to the Bug Out timeline of 72-hours.  Try to only pack what you need for that specific timeline.  If you’ve tossed in a roll of dental floss, consider measuring out what you need for three days instead.  Same goes for soap, deodorant, etc.  You may be able to cut down the portions for several items in your pack.  This will certainly reduce weight.

TIP # 4: Clothing Items

Extra clothing is a luxury, not a necessity.  From a hygiene standpoint you should only be concerned about an extra set of underwear, socks and t-shirt.  Consider the clothes you’re wearing when you leave the house to be your only set (so dress in weather appropriate clothing BEFORE evacuating).  Then, for the sake of hygiene, pack only one SKIVVY ROLL.  A military friend of mine introduced me to the phrase SKIVVY ROLL.  It’s a way of neatly folding your socks, underwear and t-shirt into a nice compact bundle.  Folded this way, these items are easy to pack and easy to find and pack down into a surprising small little bundle.  Below is a photo tutorial about how to make a SKIVVY ROLL.

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TIP # 5: Replace Your Tent Shelter with a Tarp Shelter System

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I personally pack a lightweight backpacking tent in my BOB – actually strapped to the outside as you can see in the photo.  However, a tent is a luxury.  You can really cut weight if you decide to pack a couple sil-nylon tarps instead.  Of course, constructing a tarp shelter certainly takes more skill than assembling a tent.  This reduction in pack weight does come with sacrifices.  First, tarp shelters are not as good as tents – I don’t care how you set them up.  I’ve slept in both many, many times and I’ll always prefer a tent except for the occasional perfect 40 degree fall night in October.  Tarp shelters always have at least one open wall which allows for the entry of a variety of nuisances – moisture, insects, snow, light, smoke, etc.  Below is one of my favorite tarp configurations that I call THE WEDGE.  A tarp can be erected this way in under 1 minute and provides excellent protection from the elements.  NOTE:  Wind direction comes toward the back!

tarp

TIP # 6: Replace Gear with Knowledge

You’ve all heard it before: Knowledge weighs nothing.  But boy does it takes up time!  Some would rather pack the weight than spend the time.

Knowledge takes time.  Some would rather pack the weight than spend the time.  -Creek Stewart

However, the more you learn about shelter, water, fire and food, the less gear you’ll need to pack – period.  I’ve long been a fan of redundancy in the CORE FOUR Survival Needs: SHELTER, WATER, FIRE and FOOD.  I often recommend that people carry a back up fire starter, or a water filter or emergency shelter in addition to their tent but these redundant items become less necessary as your level of practice and experience increases.  Is there an area where you can replace weight with knowledge?

Yo, you gotta tip?

What have you guys done to cut weight in your BOB?  I’m sure there are some really creative ideas out there that others can learn from and implement as well.  Don’t be shy, do tell.

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

By Creek Stewart

www.willowhavenoutdoor.com

The Take Down Survival Bow & Arrow: 6 Reasons You Should Consider Owning One

I am a big fan of the Bow & Arrow for many reasons. I personally think that anyone who has an interest in primitive survival skills or modern urban survival should seriously consider purchasing a good Bow & Arrow and become proficient in using it. There are 100s of bows to choose from. My Bow of choice is an October Mountain Blue Ridge Hunter Take Down Recurve Bow. Below are 6 Reasons why I think you should consider owning a Survival Take Down Bow.
1. PORTABILITY
“Take Down” means that the bow comes apart in 3 pieces: the middle grip section & the 2 limbs. It is super simple to ‘take down’ – just the twist of a couple lug screws and voila. The fact that it comes apart makes it very portable. You can stash the bow in your pack or Bug Out Bag. It’s perfect for a Bug Out Vehicle or BOL (Bug Out Location) cache. And, it weighs very little. My bow weighs only a couple of pounds – if that.

survival-bow-taken-down-300x168Creek’s Survival Take Down Recurve Bow

takedown-bow-bushcraft-pack-168x300

Takedown Recurve Bow & Arrows in the WillowHavenOutdoor Utforska Bushcraft Pack

2. AFFORDABLE
A good Take Down Bow should only cost you a couple 100 bucks and if you take care of it, you can expect it to last your lifetime. Not only is the bow itself affordable, but the ammunition (arrows) are cost effective too. Once you hone your shooting skills, you should be able to retrieve your arrows after shooting….and reuse them over and over again. With a little practice, you can easily make your own arrows using wooden dowels or even natural found wood and plant shafts.

3. VERSATILITY
Modern arrows have come a long way. Most new carbon fiber arrows (ultra light weight) have a tip that accepts different screw in arrow tips. I have an extensive selection of tips to choose from: small game stunner tips, broad head razor large game tips, standard practice tips, hook tip and line for bow fishing, etc… I’ve killed both squirrel and deer using my Take Down Bow with different arrow tips. A good selection of arrow tips can be easily kept in a pack or vehicle. I practice flint knapping regularly so that if I was ever in a situation when I need to make my own arrow points I would know how.

survival-bow-variety-arrow-points-300x218Some modern arrow points as compared to flint arrow-heads

arrow-hunting-points-300x199

Variety of Arrow Tips: Offers hunting versatility

4. LAWS, RED TAPE & PAPERWORK
Legal limitations and laws are much more lax on the Bow & Arrow than they are with guns and bullets. You don’t have to mess with paperwork and permits even though in the right hands the Bow & Arrow is equally as deadly. The less you have to deal with this stuff the better – especially if things get messy.

takedown-recurve-survival-bow-300x200

Take Down Recurve Bow: A Great Survival Bow

5. SILENT
The bow and arrow is very quiet weapon. You never know when you might need the convenience of a weapon that is silent & deadly.

6. MULTI-USE
Some pieces of a Take Down Recurve Bow Kit can be Multi-Use items – this is always a plus. I like for everything I pack to have at least 2-3 other uses. The first and most obvious is the Bow String. Bow strings range in length from 4 feet to 6 feet and are incredible strong. You could use a bow string in a variety of ways. Below is just a brief list:

– Bow Drill for Fire
– Snares/Traps
– Cordage for Shelter Building
– Trot Line Fishing

If you are packing a bow then you are probably packing a few arrows as well. Arrows can be used as spears and gigs for small game & fish. They can also be lashed to a longer shaft and used as a larger spear for big game such as wild pig. This larger spear can be used in self defense as well. Imagine a spear with 3 Arrows lashed to the end and each of the arrows had a razor broadhead on the tip – you can’t even buy a spear that effective. I’m sure there are some more multi-use features but these are the few I could easily think of. I would love to hear any ideas you have on the subject of Multi-Use with a Bow and Arrow Kit.

My Final Thoughts:

Positives:
– Very Portable for such an effective long range weapon
– Silent
– Affordable
– Multi-Use
– Can reuse arrows
– Can make arrows in the bush
– Lax laws

Negatives:
– Requires practive and skill to be effective
– Arrows can be a little cumbersome to pack

A few good movies that feature a Bow & Arrow in a Survival Situation are:
– Book of Eli
– Red Dawn
– Rambo – pretty much all of them

What I enjoy most about a Bow & Arrow is that it requires skill to use. It is a weapon that carries a certain amount of respect. 99% of being able to effectively use the Bow & Arrow is the skill itself – not the equipment. The skill will always be with you. Even if your bow is damaged or broken in a survival situation or stolen in a bug out situation, you can make a bow as long as you have a nice strong piece of cordage. In the photo below I made this bow from a hickory sapling using only my knife. I also made the arrow. Making a bow and arrow in the bush is definitely an option. However, it will do you know good if you don’t know how to shoot it. Preparation is the key. Practice now for the situation later.

creek-hickory-bow-300x199

Hopefully this was useful content if you are thinking about getting a Survival Take Down Bow. If you have any questions on the matter – just let me know. Would love to hear your thoughts…

By Creek Stewart

www.willowhavenoutdoor.com

8 Things You Should Know Before Buying A Gas Mask

Gas Mask

The driving plot behind some of our best-selling post-apocalyptic fiction novels is actually a looming reality for many people and nations in the world. As droves of Israeli citizens line up at the post office in Israel to pick up their government-issued gas masks, many of us can’t help but ask the depressing question, “Should I buy a gas mask?”

In this article I’ll do my best to clear up many of the questions and myths that surround one of the most iconic symbols of the survivalist movement – the gas mask.

To make an educated decision about whether or not to go on a gas-mask buying spree, you should first consider the following:

Surplus does not necessarily mean ‘good deal’

At one point or another, all of us have seen the military “surplus” gas masks advertised online, in catalogs or in Army/Navy retail stores. These masks are “surplus” for a reason. They’re either outdated and have been replaced by more effective models or they are defective. Many of the older surplus masks are famous for being incredibly difficult to deploy and also very ill-fitting even when strapped on correctly. You’ll never find a guarantee of performance on these domestic or imported surplus masks. There’s a reason for that, too. Many of them also ship with filters that are also long expired. I’ll get into that in a later heading. The price of surplus gas masks is enticing, I’ll admit, but the risk is not worth the savings. A good current gas mask that’s up to spec is going to cost at least $125, and more for many models. And that doesn’t include a stock of $40-$50 replacement filters. Surplus gas masks do make great novelties for the man cave, however.

Not all gas masks are created equal

Shocker, right? There are certain criteria you need to look for when buying a gas mask. First, make sure the mask and filter is rated for chemical blowing and riot control agents, designated by the CBA/RCA rating, and nuclear, biological and chemical agents, carrying the NBC rating.

Some gas masks on the market are nothing more than glorified surgical masks. While this may be sufficient for most biological threats, it’s also important that any mask and accompanying filter you purchase is certified to protect against nuclear and chemical threats as well. Be sure to discuss this with any supplier before ordering. Third party testing is preferred.

I prefer a mask with filter connections on both sides versus just one side or just in the front. This not only offers more flexibility (i.e. positioning the filter opposite where a gun stock may interfere), but also allows the user to positively attach a replacement filter on the opposite port before removing an expired one.

Field of view is a common frustration with many masks on the market. It’s important to have an unobstructed view during times that warrant the use of a gas mask. Many older surplus masks have small goggle-type eye holes, which virtually eliminate all peripheral vision. How about prescription glasses? It’s important to make sure the mask in consideration accommodates spectacles.

You’ll probably need a few spare filters

Not only do filters have a shelf life, but they also don’t last as long while in use as you might imagine. Most need to be replaced after just several hours of use depending on the environment and gas concentrations. Even if breathing in “uninfected air,” they last less than 24 hours. What does this mean? First, it’s not hard to imagine the need for several filters per person depending on exposure times. Second, it’s important to keep track of the expiration date for any filters on hand. At $40-$50 a pop, the cost of replacement filters can add up quick. I would suggest purchasing a mask that accepts 40mm NATO threaded filter canisters. These tend to be the most readily available and popular.

Too late is almost always too late

Unless a gas mask is securely deployed before attacks are made, it’s often already too late. Especially in the case of biological and chemical agents, even momentary exposure can be fatal. This begs the question about where you should keep a gas mask. Should it be kept in the home? At work? In the car? Or, should there be one in each location? It’s impossible to predict the time and place that a potential threat may take place. Even if you own a gas mask, a sudden and unexpected attack may not give enough warning to deploy it in time before you have to take your next breath.

Paul Bunyan probably won’t make it

paul bunyan

Most gas masks don’t play well with facial hair, and I’m not just talking about Duck Dynasty-sized beards either. The 1-week lazy man can be affected. I even have a few female relatives that might have an issue. Any type of facial hair can degrade a critically tight seal against the user’s face. If you’re serious about buying a gas mask, you should also be serious about a clean shave each morning.  NOTE:  Hooded versions of gas masks are manufactured that can be used with beards.

You were not born with innate knowledge on using a gas mask

plug-filter

Deploying and strapping on a gas mask isn’t as easy as they make it look in the movies. In fact, many have died by either putting it on incorrectly or not being able to put it on at all while under stress and panic. There are even accounts of people suffocating to death by not removing the plastic seal before screwing on a new filter. I even did this when I installed my first new filter. It’s an easy mistake to make. There is a reason the military conducts gas-mask training exercises. Properly fitting and using a gas mask requires practice. Hands-on training by a professional is preferred. Prior practice at home is an absolute minimum.

The United States is a big place

It would be very difficult to cover the entire U.S. with nuclear, biological and chemical agents. Most agree that it is those in the large cities who are in the red zones. A farmer in the middle of Kansas is much less likely to need a gas mask than someone who works in Washington, D.C. This should be considered when making preparedness expenditures. There may be better things to spend a preparedness budget on besides gas masks if you live in areas unlikely to be targeted with nuclear, biological or chemical threats.

Gas masks are a means to an end, not the end themselves

You can’t live in a gas mask. They are meant to be a temporary defense for escaping the “green cloud.” If the threat doesn’t stop (i.e. NBC attacks keep coming) and you don’t have a permanent protected place in which to retreat (like an NBC-filtered bunker or safe room), that’s bad news indeed. Even though some gas masks are fitted with drinking straws, it’s just not practical to wear a gas mask for an extended period of time. Gas masks are a short-term solution to hopefully what will be a short-term problem.

Hopefully these insights have helped to “clear the fog” around this somewhat confusing topic. Some reading this article might decide the “surplus” gas mask in the closet purchased online after 9/11 is probably better used as a Halloween costume than a life-saving survival tool. I wouldn’t hold your breath for U.S. government-issued gas masks any time soon. I don’t see that happening in the near future. If you want one, you’re going to have to buy it.

So, Creek, do YOU own a gas mask?

Yes, I do – several.  I purchased mine from http://www.approvedgasmasks.com.  I have no vested interest in that company nor do I get any kind of a kick back on sales.  They don’t even know that I’m listing them as a source.  I’m sure there are many companies out there who offer current quality gas masks.  This is just one I’ve had personal experience with.  If you know of a trusted source, by all means, leave a comment and share for others.

Do you own a gas mask?  Why or why not?

Remember, it’s not if, but when.

By Creek Stewart

www.willowhavenoutdoor.com

6 Trees Every Survivalist Should Know & Why

6 Trees Every Survivalist Should Know & Why

Here are 6 trees that all have special significance and usefulness for the survivalist.

White birch (paper birch)

birch

White birch is easy to identify with its distinctive, white, papery bark. The sycamore tree also has white bark, but it does not sluff off in thin, paper-like furls like the white birch. The sycamore also has large hand-shaped leaves versus the white birch’s smaller, oval-shaped leaves with a pointed tip. The birch leaf is also irregularly toothed.  These grow almost exclusively in northern climates.

birch-leaf

White birch survival uses:

  • Sweet drinkable sap that does not need purification
  • Containers can be fashioned from the bark (and even canoes – hence the name “canoe birch”)
  • It’s papery bark makes some of the finest fire starting tender on the planet, which will light even when damp because of its resinous quality
  • A fine tea can be made from the small twigs at the end of a branch or by shaving the bark from new growth. Toss a palmful of these elements into boiling water for a fresh, wintergreen-flavored tea
  • The tinder fungus (chaga) grows almost exclusively on the white birch tree. The fungus is one of the only natural materials I know of that will take the spark from flint and steel. A piece of tinder fungus along with flint and pyrite to create sparks were even found on Otzi, the “iceman” who was uncovered in the Austrian Alps several years ago.
  • Pine tar can be extracted from the bark of the white birch by heating it over a fire.  Pine tar makes an excellent natural adhesive which natives used for all kinds of purposes including securing stone points on arrows.

American Basswood

basswood

The American basswood (also called American linden) is a very common tree – especially in the Eastern U.S. It prefers moist soil and is often found by creeks, streams and ponds. It likes to grow several shoots from the base so it’s not uncommon to see the basswood growing in what appears to be clumps. Basswood trees have large, heart-shaped, coarsely toothed leaves and dark red young leaf buds. One of the most distinctive features of the basswood is what I call the “tongue.” A tongue-shaped leaf grows at the base of the regular heart-shaped leaves on mature trees. Hard, little, nut-like fruits dangle from the center of this “tongue” leaf throughout the summer.

basswood-cord

Basswood survival uses:

  • Delicious edible leaves – especially in spring
  • “Bass” comes from the word “bast,” which is an old word for rope. The inner fibers from the Basswood make some of the best natural cordage on the planet.  In my last course, 2 adult men could not break a 1/2″ thick strip of basswood bark.
  • Basswood is my favorite wood to use in fire by friction sets. It is soft and makes a perfect friction fire wood for bow drill spindles and hearthboards and for hand drill hearthboards.
  • Basswood is preferred by most wood carvers and chainsaw carvers because of how easy it is to work and carve
  • Inner bark layer is edible and can be scraped off with the edge of your knife. It has a very sweet flavor.

basswood-cordage

White Pine

pine-tree

The leaves of the White Pine grow in batches of 5 needles. Every fall the white pine loses all of its needles except those that grew that year. Pine is an evergreen. Evergreen trees keep some green leaves year-round, unlike deciduous trees, and have needle-like leaves. They also produce cones (pine cones) instead of flowers.

pine-needle

White pine survival uses:

  • Resin can be used a fire extender when mixed with tinder material
  • Resin can be heated and mixed with crushed charcoal to make a natural epoxy
  • Resin-rich joints and stump pieces make incredible fire kindling
  • Make pine-needle tea from the green pine needles – very rich in Vitamin C
  • Inner bark layers are edible
  • Harvest pine nuts from the pine cones
  • Pine needles make excellent fire tinder
  • Pine needles make excellent natural insulation material for debris huts and survival shelters
  • Green pine boughs are perfect for lean-to shelter roofs
  • Green pine boughs are great for making a ‘pine bough bed’ to protect from the cold ground or snow
  • The lower, dry, dead branches of the pine tree (squaw wood) is often some of the driest fire kindling available. It is exposed to the wind and also protected from the elements by the year-round needle canopy above,  I’ve also used these branches for making bow drill fire friction sets.
  • Very effective candles and lamps can be made from pine resin
  • Pine resin can be used to waterproof seams in clothing or crude containers
  • The very pliable surface layer roots make excellent (and strong) natural cordage. Use as a whole or split into smaller pieces.

White Oak (and all oaks in general)

oak

White oaks have rounded leaf lobes instead of pointed ones like red oaks. Contrary to popular belief, acorns are edible. I like white oak acorns better because it seems they are less bitter and it takes less effort to leach out the tannic acid (which causes this bitterness) to become more palatable. An abundance of acorns in mid-summer makes the oak family almost impossible to misidentify. Oaks are some of the largest trees in the forest. I have many white oaks at Willow Haven that are over 100 feet tall and easily 3-4 feet in diameter.

White oak survival uses:

  • Acorns (after leaching out the tannic acid) can be ground and used as flour to make acorn bread
  • Tannic acid (which can be extracted by boiling or leaching acorns and/or inner oak bark and twigs) is anti-bacterial. I’ve used it as an antiseptic wash before and have heard of it being used to quell diarrhea.
  • Acorns can be used a trap bait for squirrel and other small game animals
  • Can tan leather using the tannic acid found in bark, acorns and wood
  • Oak is a very hard wood that is good for ax handles, digging sticks and shelter frameworks
  • When dried, the white oak flowers make suitable tinder bundles and can be found in great abundance certain times of the year

Sugar Maple (and pretty much all maples)

maple

The sugar maple is one of my favorite trees and probably one of the most popular in the Eastern woodlands. Its beauty is on full display when the leaves change each fall into bursts of red, orange and yellow. The leaves usually have five lobes, and the tips are pointed. Young maples have smooth silvery bark. The unmistakable, “winged helicopter” seeds are a tell-tale maple tree indicator. Sugar maple is the source for maple syrup. This tree is preferred because its sap has high sugar content. It takes 40 gallons of sugar maple sap to make 1 gallon of maple syrup.

maple-tap-bucket

Sugar maple survival uses:

  • In later winter/early spring when the sap is running, the sugar maple is an excellent source of drinkable water (sap) that needs no purification. Maple Sap is nature’s version of an energy drink – rich in sugar and nutrients. I’ve filled a 1-liter canteen in as few as 15 minutes before.  Maples don’t have fully developed (or any) leaves during this time of year – hence the important of 4 season identification.
  • The seeds inside the little helicopters are edible, just like edamame. I just boil them and lightly salt. They can also be fried or added to stews. Remove the outer helicopter.
  • I almost always use maple branches for wilderness cooking. Whether it’s a spit roast, a hot dog stick or utensils, I can always find a maple branch suitable for the task. Maple branches naturally have a lot of forks, which is great for pot holders and other wilderness kitchen uses.  I also use the leaves to wrap fish or other small game animals when cooling in an earth oven.
  • Young maple leaves are also edible. Toss them into a salad or boil them down with other spring greens. They get bitter and rough as they mature.

Willow Tree

willow

There are tons of different willow varieties. Every willow I’ve seen has a similar leaf shape. The leaves are narrow, lance-shaped and grow in great numbers along the branches. Willows must be in moist areas to survive. If you’ve found a willow, then there is a water source nearby.

willow-up-close

Willow survival uses:

  • Willow bark contains a chemical called salicin, which is similar to aspirin. I can personally attest to its effectiveness in relieving headaches and inflammation. Just chew on a few small green twigs and swallow the juices.
  • In spring and summer, willow bark will peel away from the wood and makes excellent cordage that can be used for a huge variety of tasks.
  • Young willow branches and saplings are very flexible and can be used to weave a variety of different baskets and funnel traps.
  • I’ve used dried willow wood on many occasions for friction fire sets – both hand drill and bow drill
  • Willow saplings make excellent frog and fish gigs. Just split the base into 4 equal sections, press a rock to the bottom of the splits and sharpen the tines.

Final tip: Fall is a good time to go out and flag the six trees before the leaves drop (except the pine).  Revisit them in the winter and learn how to ID them by the bark alone.  Then again in the Spring with the buds and new leaves.

Feel free to list other uses for these trees that I may have overlooked in the comments below!

Remember, it’s not IF, but WHEN.

By Creek Stewart

www.willowhavenoutdoor.com

28 Cool Recycled Pallet Projects: Reuse, Recycle & Repurpose Old Wooden Pallets

29 Cool Recycled Pallet Projects - Reuse, Recycle & Repurpose Old Wooden Pallets

People amaze me.I get a real kick out of re-purposed wooden pallet projects.  People have come up with some awesome ways to recycle and reuse wooden shipping pallets and it’s truly inspiring.  While not specifically survival related, the mentality of creatively using resources is a key theme in any survivor’s mindset.  I put together a collection of some of my favorite recycled pallet projects below that I thought you would enjoy.

A note on using pallets.  Pallets are typically marked with either MB which means they’ve been chemically treated or HT which means they have been heat treated.  Some pallets are also pressure treated with preservatives.  You should try to avoid using MB marked and pressure treated pallets for interior projects and gardening projects.  Avoid those nasty chemicals!

Have any of you re-purposed a wooden pallet?  Share and comment below!

1. Vertical Planter

vertical-planter

 Source: http://www.designsponge.com/2011/09/diy-project-recycled-pallet-vertical-garden.html

2. Wall Shelves

wall-shelves

  Source: http://www.myluckylemon.com/2011/04/pallets-of-love.html

3. Garden Work Bench

garden-work-bench

 Source: http://www.bhg.com/gardening/yard/tools/make-your-own-potting-bench/#page=17

4. Variety of Chairs

chairs

   Source: http://www.slownoodle.com/search/label/Recycle%20and%20Upcycle

5. Retro Coffee Table

coffee-table

   Source: http://www.designfinch.com/2011/05/28/pallet-possibilities/

6. Wall Covering

wall-covering

 Source: http://homedecorinterioridea.com/decorate-the-walls-of-your-living-room-with-recycled-pallets.html

7. Breakfast in Bed Tray

bed-tray-mad-with-pallets

 Source: http://ehomeandgarden.net/gallery/pallet-furniture-ideas-02

8. Room Divider

room-divider

 Source: http://ehomeandgarden.net/gallery/pallet-furniture-ideas-02

9. Office Furniture

office-furniture

 Source: http://www.decoist.com/2012-02-24/office-design-from-recycled-pallets-at-brandbase-in-amsterdam/

10. Wickedly Cool Flooring

wooden-pallets-flooring

 Source: http://ehomeandgarden.net/gallery/pallet-furniture-ideas-02

11. Dining Table

dining-table

  Source: http://super-simpless.blogspot.com/2012/10/recycled-pallets-sanded-finished-as.html

12. Mason Jar Chandelier

Mason Jar Chandalier

Source:http://www.etsy.com/listing/66488968/mason-jar-chandelier-diy-candles?ref=shop_home_active

13. Compost Bins

compost-bins

 Source: http://www.threeandathirdhomestead.com/2011/06/three-bin-composter-from-recycled.html

14. End Table

end-table

 Source: http://www.treehugger.com/eco-friendly-furniture/home-furniture-pallets.html

15. Wood Shed

wood-shed.jpg

   Source: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Modern-Homesteading/Pallet-Woodshed.aspx

16. Off Grid Cabin

off-grid-cabin

    Source: http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/design-architecture/firm-turns-shipping-pallets-into-transitional-homes-for-refugees/2841

17. Day Bed

daybed

Source: http://www.inhabitots.com/adorable-toddler-bed-made-from-shipping-pallets/

18. Stairs

stairs

      Source: http://www.shft.com/shopping/most-architecture-brandbase-pallet/

19. Shoe Rack

shoe-rack

   Source: http://www.curbly.com

20. Recycled Walking Path

walking-path

   Source: http://littleecofootprints.typepad.com/little_eco_footprints/2010/07/pallet-dreaming.html

21. Barn

barn

 Source: http://charlesandhudson.com/pallet_shed/

22. Raised Bed Garden

raised-bed-garden

   Source: http://blog.greenergreengrass.com/2012/03/11/recycle-pallets-as-garden-planters/

23. Garden Tool Organizer

garden-tool-organizer

  Source: http://gardenista.com/posts/diy-garden-pallet-as-instant-tool-shed

24. Retail Fixtures

retail-fixtures

 Source: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/diy-reclaimed-pallet-shelving.html

25. Artful Coffee Table

artful-coffee-table

 Source: http://dishfunctionaldesigns.blogspot.com/2012/01/god-save-pallet-reclaimed-pallets.html

26. Flatscreen Backdrop

flatscreen-backdrop

 Source: http://www.simonetasca.com.br/

27. Pallet Sofa

Pallet-sofa

 Source: http://www.theironstonenest.com/2011/09/transformation-tuesday-outdoor-pallet.html

28. Pallet Headboard

pallet-headboard

 Source: http://homebyheidi.blogspot.com/2011/06/introducing-pineplace.html

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

By Creek Stewart

www.willowhavenoutdoor.com

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